Models that contain the Current : I p,q

(Includes both p-type and q-type currents)
Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1.  A simplified cerebellar Purkinje neuron (the PPR model) (Brown et al. 2011)
These models were implemented in NEURON by Sherry-Ann Brown in the laboratory of Leslie M. Loew. The files reproduce Figures 2c-f from Brown et al, 2011 "Virtual NEURON: a Strategy For Merged Biochemical and Electrophysiological Modeling".
2.  An ion-based model for swelling of neurons and astrocytes (Hubel & Ullah 2016)
The programs describe ion dynamics and osmosis-driven cellular swelling. “code_fig3.ode” shows a scenario of permanent cessation of energy supply / Na/K-pump activity, and the induced transition from normal conditions to the Donnan equilibrium for an isolated neuron and its extracellular space. “code_Fig7.ode” shows spreading depolarization induced by an interruption of energy supply in a model consisting of a neuron, a glia cell and the extracellular space. The simulations show the evolution of ion concentrations, Nernst potentials, the membrane potential, gating variables and cellular volumes.
3.  Axonal gap junctions produce fast oscillations in cerebellar Purkinje cells (Traub et al. 2008)
Examines how electrical coupling between proximal axons produces fast oscillations in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Traub RD, Middleton SJ, Knopfel T, Whittington MA (2008) Model of very fast (>75 Hz) network oscillations generated by electrical coupling between the proximal axons of cerebellar Purkinje cells. European Journal of Neuroscience.
4.  Axonal NaV1.6 Sodium Channels in AP Initiation of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons (Royeck et al. 2008)
"... We show that the Na+ channel NaV1.6 displays a striking aggregation at the AIS of cortical neurons. ... In combination with simulations using a realistic computer model of a CA1 pyramidal cell, our results imply that a hyperpolarized voltage-dependence of activation of AIS NaV1.6 channels is important both in determining spike threshold and localizing spike initiation to the AIS. ... These results suggest that NaV1.6 subunits at the AIS contribute significantly to its role as spike trigger zone and shape repetitive discharge properties of CA1 neurons."
5.  CA1 pyramidal neuron to study INaP properties and repetitive firing (Uebachs et al. 2010)
A model of a CA1 pyramidal neuron containing a biophysically realistic morphology and 15 distributed voltage and Ca2+-dependent conductances. Repetitive firing is modulated by maximal conductance and the voltage dependence of the persistent Na+ current (INaP).
6.  Cerebellar purkinje cell (De Schutter and Bower 1994)
Tutorial simulation of a cerebellar Purkinje cell. This tutorial is based upon a GENESIS simulation of a cerebellar Purkinje cell, modeled and fine-tuned by Erik de Schutter. The tutorial assumes that you have a basic knowledge of the Purkinje cell and its synaptic inputs. It gives visual insight in how different properties as concentrations and channel conductances vary and interact within a real Purkinje cell.
7.  Complex CA1-neuron to study AP initiation (Wimmer et al. 2010)
Complex model of a pyramidal CA1-neuron, adapted from Royeck, M., et al. Role of axonal NaV1.6 sodium channels in action potential initiation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Journal of neurophysiology 100, 2361-2380 (2008). It contains a biophysically realistic morphology comprising 265 compartments (829 segments) and 15 different distributed Ca2+- and/or voltage-dependent conductances.
8.  Computational model of bladder small DRG neuron soma (Mandge & Manchanda 2018)
Bladder small DRG neurons, which are putative nociceptors pivotal to urinary bladder function, express more than a dozen different ionic membrane mechanisms: ion channels, pumps and exchangers. Small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SKCa) channels which were earlier thought to be gated solely by intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]i ) have recently been shown to exhibit inward rectification with respect to membrane potential. The effect of SKCa inward rectification on the excitability of these neurons is unknown. Furthermore, studies on the role of KCa channels in repetitive firing and their contributions to different types of afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in these neurons are lacking. In order to study these phenomena, we first constructed and validated a biophysically detailed single compartment model of bladder small DRG soma constrained by physiological data. The model includes twenty-two major known membrane mechanisms along with intracellular Ca2+ dynamics comprising Ca2+ diffusion, cytoplasmic buffering, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial mechanisms. Using modelling studies, we show that inward rectification of SKCa is an important parameter regulating neuronal repetitive firing and that its absence reduces action potential (AP) firing frequency. We also show that SKCa is more potent in reducing AP spiking than the large-conductance KCa channel (BKCa) in these neurons. Moreover, BKCa was found to contribute to the fast AHP (fAHP) and SKCa to the medium-duration (mAHP) and slow AHP (sAHP). We also report that the slow inactivating A-type K+ channel (slow KA) current in these neurons is composed of 2 components: an initial fast inactivating (time constant ~ 25-100 ms) and a slow inactivating (time constant ~ 200-800 ms) current. We discuss the implications of our findings, and how our detailed model can help further our understanding of the role of C-fibre afferents in the physiology of urinary bladder as well as in certain disorders.
9.  Dendritica (Vetter et al 2001)
Dendritica is a collection of programs for relating dendritic geometry and signal propagation. The programs are based on those used for the simulations described in: Vetter, P., Roth, A. & Hausser, M. (2001) For reprint requests and additional information please contact Dr. M. Hausser, email address: m.hausser@ucl.ac.uk
10.  Effects of KIR current inactivation in NAc Medium Spiny Neurons (Steephen and Manchanda 2009)
"Inward rectifying potassium (KIR) currents in medium spiny (MS) neurons of nucleus accumbens inactivate significantly in ~40% of the neurons but not in the rest, which may lead to differences in input processing by these two groups. Using a 189-compartment computational model of the MS neuron, we investigate the influence of this property using injected current as well as spatiotemporally distributed synaptic inputs. Our study demonstrates that KIR current inactivation facilitates depolarization, firing frequency and firing onset in these neurons. ..."
11.  Elementary mechanisms producing facilitation of Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels
"The regulation of Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) channels by calmodulin (CaM) showcases the powerful Ca(2+) decoding capabilities of CaM in complex with the family of Ca(V)1-2 Ca(2+) channels. Throughout this family, CaM does not simply exert a binary on/off regulatory effect; rather, Ca(2+) binding to either the C- or N-terminal lobe of CaM alone can selectively trigger a distinct form of channel modulation. ... Ca(2+) binding to the C-terminal lobe induces Ca(2+)-dependent facilitation of opening (CDF), whereas the N-terminal lobe yields Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of opening (CDI). ... Furthermore, direct single-channel determinations of channel open probability (P(o)) and kinetic simulations demonstrate that CDF represents a genuine enhancement of open probability, without appreciable change of activation kinetics. This enhanced-opening mechanism suggests that the CDF evoked during action-potential trains would produce not only larger, but longer-lasting Ca(2+) responses, an outcome with potential ramifications for short-term synaptic plasticity."
12.  Modelling platform of the cochlear nucleus and other auditory circuits (Manis & Compagnola 2018)
"Models of the auditory brainstem have been an invaluable tool for testing hypotheses about auditory information processing and for highlighting the most important gaps in the experimental literature. Due to the complexity of the auditory brainstem, and indeed most brain circuits, the dynamic behavior of the system may be difficult to predict without a detailed, biologically realistic computational model. Despite the sensitivity of models to their exact construction and parameters, most prior models of the cochlear nucleus have incorporated only a small subset of the known biological properties. This confounds the interpretation of modelling results and also limits the potential future uses of these models, which require a large effort to develop. To address these issues, we have developed a general purpose, bio-physically detailed model of the cochlear nucleus for use both in testing hypotheses about cochlear nucleus function and also as an input to models of downstream auditory nuclei. The model implements conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley representations of cells using a Python-based interface to the NEURON simulator. ..."
13.  Stochastic calcium mechanisms cause dendritic calcium spike variability (Anwar et al. 2013)
" ... In single Purkinje cells, spontaneous and synaptically evoked dendritic calcium bursts come in a variety of shapes with a variable number of spikes. The mechanisms causing this variability have never been investigated thoroughly. In this study, a detailed computational model employing novel simulation routines is applied to identify the roles that stochastic ion channels, spatial arrangements of ion channels and stochastic intracellular calcium have towards producing calcium burst variability. … Our findings suggest that stochastic intracellular calcium mechanisms play a crucial role in dendritic calcium spike generation and are, therefore, an essential consideration in studies of neuronal excitability and plasticity."
14.  Synaptic integration in tuft dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (Larkum et al. 2009)
Simulations used in the paper. Voltage responses to current injections in different tuft locations; NMDA and calcium spike generation. Summation of multiple input distribution.

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