Models that contain the Cell : Dentate gyrus mossy cell

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    Models   Description
1.  Dentate gyrus (Morgan et al. 2007, 2008, Santhakumar et al. 2005, Dyhrfjeld-Johnsen et al. 2007)
This model was implemented by Rob Morgan in the Soltesz lab at UC Irvine. It is a scaleable model of the rat dentate gyrus including four cell types. This model runs in serial (on a single processor) and has been published at the size of 50,000 granule cells (with proportional numbers of the other cells).
2.  Dentate Gyrus model including Granule cells with dendritic compartments (Chavlis et al 2017)
Here we investigate the role of dentate granule cell dendrites in pattern separation. The model consists of point neurons (Integrate and fire) and in principal neurons, the granule cells, we have incorporated various number of dendrites.
3.  Dentate gyrus network model (Santhakumar et al 2005)
Mossy cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting are two characteristic consequences of repeated seizures and head trauma. However, their precise contributions to the hyperexcitable state are not well understood. Because it is difficult, and frequently impossible, to independently examine using experimental techniques whether it is the loss of mossy cells or the sprouting of mossy fibers that leads to dentate hyperexcitability, we built a biophysically realistic and anatomically representative computational model of the dentate gyrus to examine this question. The 527-cell model, containing granule, mossy, basket, and hilar cells with axonal projections to the perforant-path termination zone, showed that even weak mossy fiber sprouting (10-15% of the strong sprouting observed in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy) resulted in the spread of seizure-like activity to the adjacent model hippocampal laminae after focal stimulation of the perforant path. See reference for more and details.
4.  Dentate gyrus network model (Tejada et al 2014)
" ... Here we adapted an existing computational model of the dentate gyrus (J Neurophysiol 93: 437-453, 2005) by replacing the reduced granule cell models with morphologically detailed models coming from (3D) reconstructions of mature cells. ... Different fractions of the mature granule cell models were replaced by morphologically reconstructed models of newborn dentate granule cells from animals with PILO-induced Status Epilepticus, which have apical dendritic alterations and spine loss, and control animals, which do not have these alterations. This complex arrangement of cells and processes allowed us to study the combined effect of mossy fiber sprouting, altered apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells on the excitability of the dentate gyrus model. Our simulations suggest that alterations in the apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells have opposing effects on the excitability of the dentate gyrus after Status Epilepticus. Apical dendritic alterations potentiate the increase of excitability provoked by mossy fiber sprouting while spine loss curtails this increase. "
5.  Dentate gyrus network model pattern separation and granule cell scaling in epilepsy (Yim et al 2015)
The dentate gyrus (DG) is thought to enable efficient hippocampal memory acquisition via pattern separation. With patterns defined as spatiotemporally distributed action potential sequences, the principal DG output neurons (granule cells, GCs), presumably sparsen and separate similar input patterns from the perforant path (PP). In electrophysiological experiments, we have demonstrated that during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), GCs downscale their excitability by transcriptional upregulation of ‘leak’ channels. Here we studied whether this cell type-specific intrinsic plasticity is in a position to homeostatically adjust DG network function. We modified an established conductance-based computer model of the DG network such that it realizes a spatiotemporal pattern separation task, and quantified its performance with and without the experimentally constrained leaky GC phenotype. ...
6.  Epilepsy may be caused by very small functional changes in ion channels (Thomas et al. 2009)
We used a previously published model of the dentate gyrus with varying degrees of mossy fibre sprouting.We preformed a sensitivity analysis where we systematically varied individual properties of ion channels. The results predict that genetic variations in the properties of sodium channels are likely to have the biggest impact on network excitability. Furthermore, these changes may be as small as 1mV, which is currently undetectable using standard experimental practices.
7.  In vivo imaging of dentate gyrus mossy cells in behaving mice (Danielson et al 2017)
Mossy cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus constitute a major excitatory principal cell type in the mammalian hippocampus, however, it remains unknown how these cells behave in vivo. Here, we have used two-photon Ca2+ imaging to monitor the activity of mossy cells in awake, behaving mice. We find that mossy cells are significantly more active than dentate granule cells in vivo, exhibit significant spatial tuning during head-fixed spatial navigation, and undergo robust remapping of their spatial representations in response to contextual manipulation. Our results provide the first characterization of mossy cells in the behaving animal and demonstrate their active participation in spatial coding and contextual representation.
8.  Long time windows from theta modulated inhib. in entorhinal–hippo. loop (Cutsuridis & Poirazi 2015)
"A recent experimental study (Mizuseki et al., 2009) has shown that the temporal delays between population activities in successive entorhinal and hippocampal anatomical stages are longer (about 70–80 ms) than expected from axon conduction velocities and passive synaptic integration of feed-forward excitatory inputs. We investigate via computer simulations the mechanisms that give rise to such long temporal delays in the hippocampus structures. ... The model shows that the experimentally reported long temporal delays in the DG, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal regions are due to theta modulated somatic and axonic inhibition..."
9.  Na channel mutations in the dentate gyrus (Thomas et al. 2009)
These are source files to generate the data in Figure 6 from "Mossy fiber sprouting interacts with sodium channel mutations to increase dentate gyrus excitability" Thomas EA, Reid CA, Petrou S, Epilepsia (2009)
10.  State dependent drug binding to sodium channels in the dentate gyrus (Thomas & Petrou 2013)
A Markov model of sodium channels was developed that includes drug binding to fast inactivated states. This was incorporated into a model of the dentate gyrus to investigate the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on neuron and network properties.

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