Models that contain the Model Concept : Working memory

(A short term memory that is used to store short sequences for example telephone numbers (when trying to remember one for the first time), sentences just heard or read, or the current spatial placement of objects.)
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    Models   Description
1.  A spiking model of cortical broadcast and competition (Shanahan 2008)
"This paper presents a computer model of cortical broadcast and competition based on spiking neurons and inspired by the hypothesis of a global neuronal workspace underlying conscious information processing in the human brain. In the model, the hypothesised workspace is realised by a collection of recurrently interconnected regions capable of sustaining and disseminating a reverberating spatial pattern of activation. ..."
2.  Alternative time representation in dopamine models (Rivest et al. 2009)
Combines a long short-term memory (LSTM) model of the cortex to a temporal difference learning (TD) model of the basal ganglia. Code to run simulations similar to the published data: Rivest, F, Kalaska, J.F., Bengio, Y. (2009) Alternative time representation in dopamine models. Journal of Computational Neuroscience. See http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10827-009-0191-1 for details.
3.  AOB mitral cell: persistent activity without feedback (Zylbertal et al., 2015)
Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. This is a realistic conductance-based model that was constructed using the detailed morphology of a single typical accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) mitral cell for which the electrophysiological properties were characterized.
4.  Ca+/HCN channel-dependent persistent activity in multiscale model of neocortex (Neymotin et al 2016)
"Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. ..."
5.  CA1 pyramidal neurons: binding properties and the magical number 7 (Migliore et al. 2008)
NEURON files from the paper: Single neuron binding properties and the magical number 7, by M. Migliore, G. Novara, D. Tegolo, Hippocampus, in press (2008). In an extensive series of simulations with realistic morphologies and active properties, we demonstrate how n radial (oblique) dendrites of these neurons may be used to bind n inputs to generate an output signal. The results suggest a possible neural code as the most effective n-ple of dendrites that can be used for short-term memory recollection of persons, objects, or places. Our analysis predicts a straightforward physiological explanation for the observed puzzling limit of about 7 short-term memory items that can be stored by humans.
6.  Effect of cortical D1 receptor sensitivity on working memory maintenance (Reneaux & Gupta 2018)
Alterations in cortical D1 receptor density and reactivity of dopamine-binding sites, collectively termed as D1 receptor-sensitivity in the present study, have been experimentally shown to affect the working memory maintenance during delay-period. However, computational models addressing the effect of D1 receptor-sensitivity are lacking. A quantitative neural mass model of the prefronto-mesoprefrontal system has been proposed to take into account the effect of variation in cortical D1 receptor-sensitivity on working memory maintenance during delay. The model computes the delay-associated equilibrium states/operational points of the system for different values of D1 receptor-sensitivity through the nullcline and bifurcation analysis. Further, to access the robustness of the working memory maintenance during delay in the presence of alteration in D1 receptor-sensitivity, numerical simulations of the stochastic formulation of the model are performed to obtain the global potential landscape of the dynamics.
7.  Effects of Guanfacine and Phenylephrine on a model of working memory (Duggins et al 2017)
"We use a spiking neural network model of working memory (WM) capable of performing the spatial delayed response task (DRT) to investigate two drugs that affect WM: guanfacine (GFC) and phenylephrine (PHE). In this model, the loss of information over time results from changes in the spiking neural activity through recurrent connections. We reproduce the standard forgetting curve and then show that this curve changes in the presence of GFC and PHE, whose application is simulated by manipulating functional, neural, and biophysical properties of the model. ... We compare our model to both electrophysiological data from neurons in monkey dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and to behavioral evidence from monkeys performing the DRT."
8.  Fronto-parietal visuospatial WM model with HH cells (Edin et al 2007)
1) J Cogn Neurosci: 3 structural mechanisms that had been hypothesized to underlie vsWM development during childhood were evaluated by simulating the model and comparing results to fMRI. It was concluded that inter-regional synaptic connection strength cause vsWM development. 2) J Integr Neurosci: Given the importance of fronto-parietal connections, we tested whether connection asymmetry affected resistance to distraction. We drew the conclusion that stronger frontal connections are beneficial. By comparing model results to EEG, we concluded that the brain indeed has stronger frontal-to-parietal connections than vice versa.
9.  Inhibitory control by an integral feedback signal in prefrontal cortex (Miller and Wang 2006)
The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is known to be critical for inhibitory control of behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we propose that inhibitory control can be instantiated by an integral signal derived from working memory, another key function of the PFC. Specifically, we assume that an integrator converts excitatory input into a graded mnemonic activity that provides an inhibitory signal (integral feedback control) to upstream afferent neurons. We demonstrate this scenario in a neuronal-network model for a temporal discrimination task... See paper for details and more.
10.  Irregular spiking in NMDA-driven prefrontal cortex neurons (Durstewitz and Gabriel 2006)
Slow N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) synaptic currents are assumed to strongly contribute to the persistently elevated firing rates observed in prefrontal cortex (PFC) during working memory. During persistent activity, spiking of many neurons is highly irregular. ... The highest interspike-interval (ISI) variability occurred in a transition regime where the subthreshold membrane potential distribution shifts from mono- to bimodality, ... Predictability within irregular ISI series was significantly higher than expected from a noise-driven linear process, indicating that it might best be described through complex (potentially chaotic) nonlinear deterministic processes. Accordingly, the phenomena observed in vitro could be reproduced in purely deterministic biophysical model neurons. High spiking irregularity in these models emerged within a chaotic, close-to-bifurcation regime characterized by a shift of the membrane potential distribution from mono- to bimodality and by similar ISI return maps as observed in vitro. ... NMDA-induced irregular dynamics may have important implications for computational processes during working memory and neural coding.
11.  L5 PFC microcircuit used to study persistent activity (Papoutsi et al. 2014, 2013)
Using a heavily constrained biophysical model of a L5 PFC microcircuit we investigate the mechanisms that underlie persistent activity emergence (ON) and termination (OFF) and search for the minimum network size required for expressing these states within physiological regimes.
12.  Large-scale neural model of visual short-term memory (Ulloa, Horwitz 2016; Horwitz, et al. 2005,...)
Large-scale neural model of visual short term memory embedded into a 998-node connectome. The model simulates electrical activity across neuronal populations of a number of brain regions and converts that activity into fMRI and MEG time-series. The model uses a neural simulator developed at the Brain Imaging and Modeling Section of the National Institutes of Health.
13.  Model of CA1 activity during working memory task (Spera et al. 2016)
"The cellular processes underlying individual differences in the Woring Memory Capacity (WMC) of humans are essentially unknown. Psychological experiments suggest that subjects with lower working memory capacity (LWMC), with respect to subjects with higher capacity (HWMC), take more time to recall items from a list because they search through a larger set of items and are much more susceptible to interference during retrieval. ... In this paper, we investigate the possible underlying mechanisms at the single neuron level by using a computational model of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which have been suggested to be deeply involved in the recognition of specific items. ..."
14.  Model of working memory based on negative derivative feedback (Lim and Goldman, 2013)
We proposed a model of working memory in which recurrent synaptic interactions provide a corrective feedback that enables persistent activity to be maintained stably for prolonged durations. When recurrent excitatory and inhibitory inputs to memory neurons were balanced in strength and offset in time, drifts in activity triggered a corrective signal that counteracted memory decay. Circuits containing this mechanism temporally integrated their inputs, generated the irregular neural firing observed during persistent activity and were robust against common perturbations that severely disrupted previous models of short-term memory storage.
15.  NMDAR & GABAB/KIR Give Bistable Dendrites: Working Memory & Sequence Readout (Sanders et al., 2013)
" ...Here, we show that the voltage dependence of the inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) conductance activated by GABA(B) receptors adds substantial robustness to network simulations of bistability and the persistent firing that it underlies. The hyperpolarized state is robust because, at hyperpolarized potentials, the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is high and the NMDA conductance is low; the depolarized state is robust because, at depolarized potentials, the NMDA conductance is high and the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is low. Our results suggest that this complementary voltage dependence of GABA(B)/KIR and NMDA conductances makes them a "perfect couple" for producing voltage bistability."
16.  Persistent Spiking in ACC Neurons (Ratte et al 2018)
"Neurons use action potentials, or spikes, to encode information. Some neurons can store information for short periods (seconds to minutes) by continuing to spike after a stimulus ends, thus enabling working memory. This so-called “persistent” spiking occurs in many brain areas and has been linked to activation of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels. However, TRPC activation alone is insufficient to explain many aspects of persistent spiking such as resumption of spiking after periods of imposed quiescence. Using experiments and simulations, we show that calcium influx caused by spiking is necessary and sufficient to activate TRPC channels and that the ensuing positive feedback interaction between intracellular calcium and TRPC channel activation can account for many hitherto unexplained aspects of persistent spiking."
17.  Spikes,synchrony,and attentive learning by laminar thalamocort. circuits (Grossberg & Versace 2007)
"... The model hereby clarifies, for the first time, how the following levels of brain organization coexist to realize cognitive processing properties that regulate fast learning and stable memory of brain representations: single cell properties, such as spiking dynamics, spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), and acetylcholine modulation; detailed laminar thalamic and cortical circuit designs and their interactions; aggregate cell recordings, such as current-source densities and local field potentials; and single cell and large-scale inter-areal oscillations in the gamma and beta frequency domains. ..."
18.  Storing serial order in intrinsic excitability: a working memory model (Conde-Sousa & Aguiar 2013)
" … Here we present a model for working memory which relies on the modulation of the intrinsic excitability properties of neurons, instead of synaptic plasticity, to retain novel information for periods of seconds to minutes. We show that it is possible to effectively use this mechanism to store the serial order in a sequence of patterns of activity. … The presented model exhibits properties which are in close agreement with experimental results in working memory. ... "
19.  Working memory circuit with branched dendrites (Morita 2008)
This is a rate-coding model of the neocortical spatial working memory circuit incorporating multiple dendritic branches of the individual pyramidal cell in order to examine how nonlinear dendritic integration, combined with the nonuniform distribution of the external input, affects the behavior of the whole circuit.

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