Models that contain the Receptor : NMDA

Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1.  2D model of olfactory bulb gamma oscillations (Li and Cleland 2017)
This is a biophysical model of the olfactory bulb (OB) that contains three types of neurons: mitral cells, granule cells and periglomerular cells. The model is used to study the cellular and synaptic mechanisms of OB gamma oscillations. We concluded that OB gamma oscillations can be best modeled by the coupled oscillator architecture termed pyramidal resonance inhibition network gamma (PRING).
2.  3D model of the olfactory bulb (Migliore et al. 2014)
This entry contains a link to a full HD version of movie 1 and the NEURON code of the paper: "Distributed organization of a brain microcircuit analysed by three-dimensional modeling: the olfactory bulb" by M Migliore, F Cavarretta, ML Hines, and GM Shepherd.
3.  3D olfactory bulb: operators (Migliore et al, 2015)
"... Using a 3D model of mitral and granule cell interactions supported by experimental findings, combined with a matrix-based representation of glomerular operations, we identify the mechanisms for forming one or more glomerular units in response to a given odor, how and to what extent the glomerular units interfere or interact with each other during learning, their computational role within the olfactory bulb microcircuit, and how their actions can be formalized into a theoretical framework in which the olfactory bulb can be considered to contain "odor operators" unique to each individual. ..."
4.  A 1000 cell network model for Lateral Amygdala (Kim et al. 2013)
1000 Cell Lateral Amygdala model for investigation of plasticity and memory storage during Pavlovian Conditioning.
5.  A computational approach/model to explore NMDA receptors functions (Keller et al 2017)
"... Here, we describe a general computational method aiming at developing kinetic Markov-chain based models of NMDARs subtypes capable of reproducing various experimental results. These models are then used to make predictions on additional (non-obvious) properties and on their role in synaptic function under various physiological and pharmacological conditions. For the purpose of this book chapter, we will focus on the method used to develop a NMDAR model that includes pharmacological site of action of different compounds. Notably, this elementary model can subsequently be included in a neuron model (not described in detail here) to explore the impact of their differential distribution on synaptic functions."
6.  A dendritic disinhibitory circuit mechanism for pathway-specific gating (Yang et al. 2016)
"While reading a book in a noisy café, how does your brain ‘gate in’ visual information while filtering out auditory stimuli? Here we propose a mechanism for such flexible routing of information flow in a complex brain network (pathway-specific gating), tested using a network model of pyramidal neurons and three classes of interneurons with connection probabilities constrained by data. We find that if inputs from different pathways cluster on a pyramidal neuron dendrite, a pathway can be gated-on by a disinhibitory circuit motif. ..."
7.  A detailed data-driven network model of prefrontal cortex (Hass et al 2016)
Data-based PFC-like circuit with layer 2/3 and 5, synaptic clustering, four types of interneurons and cell-type specific short-term synaptic plasticity; neuron parameters fitted to in vitro data, all other parameters constrained by experimental literature. Reproduces key features of in vivo resting state activity without specific tuning.
8.  A fast model of voltage-dependent NMDA Receptors (Moradi et al. 2013)
These are two or triple-exponential models of the voltage-dependent NMDA receptors. Conductance of these receptors increase voltage-dependently with a "Hodgkin and Huxley-type" gating style that is also depending on glutamate-binding. Time course of the gating of these receptors in response to glutamate are also changing voltage-dependently. Temperature sensitivity and desensitization of these receptor are also taken into account. Three previous kinetic models that are able to simulate the voltage-dependence of the NMDARs are also imported to the NMODL. These models are not temperature sensitive. These models are compatible with the "event delivery system" of NEURON. Parameters that are reported in our paper are applicable to CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites.
9.  A mathematical model of a neurovascular unit (Dormanns et al 2015, 2016) (Farrs & David 2011)
Here a lumped parameter numerical model of a neurovascular unit is presented, representing an intercellular communication system based on ion exchange through pumps and channels between neurons, astrocytes, smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and the spaces between these cells: the synaptic cleft between the neuron and astrocyte, the perivascular space between the astrocyte and SMC, and the extracellular space surrounding the cells. The model contains various cellular and chemical pathways such as potassium, astrocytic calcium, and nitric oxide. The model is able to simulate neurovascular coupling, the process characterised by an increase in neuronal activity followed by a rapid dilation of local blood vessels and hence increased blood supply providing oxygen and glucose to cells in need.
10.  A model of unitary responses from A/C and PP synapses in CA3 pyramidal cells (Baker et al. 2010)
The model was used to reproduce experimentally determined mean synaptic response characteristics of unitary AMPA and NMDA synaptic stimulations in CA3 pyramidal cells with the objective of inferring the most likely response properties of the corresponding types of synapses. The model is primarily concerned with passive cells, but models of active dendrites are included.
11.  A multilayer cortical model to study seizure propagation across microdomains (Basu et al. 2015)
A realistic neural network was used to simulate a region of neocortex to obtain extracellular LFPs from ‘virtual micro-electrodes’ and produce test data for comparison with multisite microelectrode recordings. A model was implemented in the GENESIS neurosimulator. A simulated region of cortex was represented by layers 2/3, 5/6 (interneurons and pyramidal cells) and layer 4 stelate cells, spaced at 25 µm in each horizontal direction. Pyramidal cells received AMPA and NMDA inputs from neighboring cells at the basal and apical dendrites. The LFP data was generated by simulating 16-site electrode array with the help of ‘efield’ objects arranged at the predetermined positions with respect to the surface of the simulated network. The LFP for the model is derived from a weighted average of the current sources summed over all cellular compartments. Cell models were taken from from Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol 93(4):2194-232.
12.  A multiscale approach to analyze circadian rhythms (Vasalou & Henson, 2010) (CellML)
" ... We developed a firing rate code model to incorporate known electrophysiological properties of SCN (suprachiasmatic nucleus) pacemaker cells, including circadian dependent changes in membrane voltage and ion conductances. Calcium dynamics were included in the model as the putative link between electrical firing and gene expression. Individual ion currents exhibited oscillatory patterns matching experimental data both in current levels and phase relationships. VIP and GABA neurotransmitters, which encode synaptic signals across the SCN, were found to play critical roles in daily oscillations of membrane excitability and gene expression. Blocking various mechanisms of intracellular calcium accumulation by simulated pharmacological agents (nimodipine, IP3- and ryanodine-blockers) reproduced experimentally observed trends in firing rate dynamics and core-clock gene transcription. The intracellular calcium concentration was shown to regulate diverse circadian processes such as firing frequency, gene expression and system periodicity. The model predicted a direct relationship between firing frequency and gene expression amplitudes, demonstrated the importance of intracellular pathways for single cell behavior and provided a novel multiscale framework which captured characteristics of the SCN at both the electrophysiological and gene regulatory levels."
13.  A multiscale approach to analyze circadian rhythms (Vasalou & Henson, 2010) (SBML)
" ... We developed a firing rate code model to incorporate known electrophysiological properties of SCN (suprachiasmatic nucleus) pacemaker cells, including circadian dependent changes in membrane voltage and ion conductances. Calcium dynamics were included in the model as the putative link between electrical firing and gene expression. Individual ion currents exhibited oscillatory patterns matching experimental data both in current levels and phase relationships. VIP and GABA neurotransmitters, which encode synaptic signals across the SCN, were found to play critical roles in daily oscillations of membrane excitability and gene expression. Blocking various mechanisms of intracellular calcium accumulation by simulated pharmacological agents (nimodipine, IP3- and ryanodine-blockers) reproduced experimentally observed trends in firing rate dynamics and core-clock gene transcription. The intracellular calcium concentration was shown to regulate diverse circadian processes such as firing frequency, gene expression and system periodicity. The model predicted a direct relationship between firing frequency and gene expression amplitudes, demonstrated the importance of intracellular pathways for single cell behavior and provided a novel multiscale framework which captured characteristics of the SCN at both the electrophysiological and gene regulatory levels."
14.  A simplified model of NMDA oscillations in lamprey locomotor neurons (Huss et al. 2008)
Using experiments in conjunction with this simplified model, we sought to understand the basic mechanisms behind NMDA-induced oscillations in lamprey locomotor neurons, specifically (a) how the oscillation frequency depends on NMDA concentration and why, and (b) what the minimal number of components for generating NMDA oscillations is (in vitro and in the model).
15.  A single column thalamocortical network model (Traub et al 2005)
To better understand population phenomena in thalamocortical neuronal ensembles, we have constructed a preliminary network model with 3,560 multicompartment neurons (containing soma, branching dendrites, and a portion of axon). Types of neurons included superficial pyramids (with regular spiking [RS] and fast rhythmic bursting [FRB] firing behaviors); RS spiny stellates; fast spiking (FS) interneurons, with basket-type and axoaxonic types of connectivity, and located in superficial and deep cortical layers; low threshold spiking (LTS) interneurons, that contacted principal cell dendrites; deep pyramids, that could have RS or intrinsic bursting (IB) firing behaviors, and endowed either with non-tufted apical dendrites or with long tufted apical dendrites; thalamocortical relay (TCR) cells; and nucleus reticularis (nRT) cells. To the extent possible, both electrophysiology and synaptic connectivity were based on published data, although many arbitrary choices were necessary.
16.  A spatial model of the intermediate superior colliculus (Moren et. al. 2013)
A spatial model of the intermediate superior colliculus. It reproduces the collicular saccade-generating output profile from NMDA receptor-driven burst neurons, shaped by integrative inhibitory feedback from spreading buildup neuron activity. The model is consistent with the view that collicular activity directly shapes the temporal profile of saccadic eye movements. We use the Adaptive exponential integrate and fire neuron model, augmented with an NMDA-like membrane potential-dependent receptor. In addition, we use a synthetic spike integrator model as a stand-in for a spike-integrator circuit in the reticular formation. NOTE: We use a couple of custom neuron models, so the supplied model file includes an entire version of NEST. I also include a patch that applies to a clean version of the simulator (see the doc/README).
17.  A synapse model for developing somatosensory cortex (Manninen et al 2020)
We developed a model for an L4-L2/3 synapse in somatosensory cortex to study the role of astrocytes in modulation of t-LTD. Our model includes the one-compartmental presynaptic L4 spiny stellate cell, two-compartmental (soma and dendrite) postsynaptic L2/3 pyramidal cell, and one-compartmental fine astrocyte process.
18.  A two-layer biophysical olfactory bulb model of cholinergic neuromodulation (Li and Cleland 2013)
This is a two-layer biophysical olfactory bulb (OB) network model to study cholinergic neuromodulation. Simulations show that nicotinic receptor activation sharpens mitral cell receptive field, while muscarinic receptor activation enhances network synchrony and gamma oscillations. This general model suggests that the roles of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in OB are both distinct and complementary to one another, together regulating the effects of ascending cholinergic inputs on olfactory bulb transformations.
19.  A unified thalamic model of multiple distinct oscillations (Li, Henriquez and Fröhlich 2017)
We present a unified model of the thalamus that is capable of independently generating multiple distinct oscillations (delta, spindle, alpha and gamma oscillations) under different levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE) modulation corresponding to different physiological conditions (deep sleep, light sleep, relaxed wakefulness and attention). The model also shows that entrainment of thalamic oscillations is state-dependent.
20.  Acetylcholine Boosts Dendritic NMDA Spikes in a CA3 Pyramidal Neuron Model (Humphries et al., 2021)
This model was used to compare the nonlinearity of NMDA inputs between dendritic sections in a CA3 pyramidal neuron as well as investigate the effect of cholinergic modulation/potassium channel inhibition on this dendritic NMDA-mediated nonlinearity.
21.  Active dendrites shape signaling microdomains in hippocampal neurons (Basak & Narayanan 2018)
The spatiotemporal spread of biochemical signals in neurons and other cells regulate signaling specificity, tuning of signal propagation, along with specificity and clustering of adaptive plasticity. Theoretical and experimental studies have demonstrated a critical role for cellular morphology and the topology of signaling networks in regulating this spread. In this study, we add a significantly complex dimension to this narrative by demonstrating that voltage-gated ion channels (A-type Potassium channels and T-type Calcium channels) on the plasma membrane could actively amplify or suppress the strength and spread of downstream signaling components. We employed a multiscale, multicompartmental, morphologically realistic, conductance-based model that accounted for the biophysics of electrical signaling and the biochemistry of calcium handling and downstream enzymatic signaling in a hippocampal pyramidal neuron. We chose the calcium – calmodulin – calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) – protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) signaling pathway owing to its critical importance to several forms of neuronal plasticity, and employed physiologically relevant theta-burst stimulation (TBS) or theta-burst pairing (TBP) protocol to initiate a calcium microdomain through NMDAR activation at a synapse.
22.  Active dendritic integration in robust and precise grid cell firing (Schmidt-Hieber et al 2017)
"... Whether active dendrites contribute to the generation of the dual temporal and rate codes characteristic of grid cell output is unknown. We show that dendrites of medial entorhinal cortex neurons are highly excitable and exhibit a supralinear input–output function in vitro, while in vivo recordings reveal membrane potential signatures consistent with recruitment of active dendritic conductances. By incorporating these nonlinear dynamics into grid cell models, we show that they can sharpen the precision of the temporal code and enhance the robustness of the rate code, thereby supporting a stable, accurate representation of space under varying environmental conditions. Our results suggest that active dendrites may therefore constitute a key cellular mechanism for ensuring reliable spatial navigation."
23.  Afferent Integration in the NAcb MSP Cell (Wolf et al. 2005)
"We describe a computational model of the principal cell in the nucleus accumbens (NAcb), the medium spiny projection (MSP) neuron. The model neuron, constructed in NEURON, includes all of the known ionic currents in these cells and receives synaptic input from simulated spike trains via NMDA, AMPA, and GABAA receptors. ... results suggest that afferent information integration by the NAcb MSP cell may be compromised by pathology in which the NMDA current is altered or modulated, as has been proposed in both schizophrenia and addiction."
24.  An allosteric kinetics of NMDARs in STDP (Urakubo et al. 2008)
"... We developed a detailed biophysical model of STDP and found that the model required spike timing-dependent distinct suppression of NMDARs by Ca2+-calmodulin. This led us to predict an allosteric kinetics of NMDARs: a slow and rapid suppression of NMDARs by Ca2+-calmodulin with prespiking -> postspiking and postspiking -> prespiking, respectively. We found that the allosteric kinetics, but not the conventional kinetics, is consistent with specific features of amplitudes and peak time of NMDAR-mediated EPSPs in experiments. ..." See paper for more and details.
25.  An attractor network model of grid cells and theta-nested gamma oscillations (Pastoll et al 2013)
A two population spiking continuous attractor model of grid cells. This model combines the attractor dynamics with theta-nested gamma oscillatory activity. It reproduces the behavioural response of grid cells (grid fields) in medial entorhinal cortex, while at the same time allowing for nested gamma oscillations of post-synaptic currents.
26.  AP back-prop. explains threshold variability and rapid rise (McCormick et al. 2007, Yu et al. 2008)
This simple axon-soma model explained how the rapid rising phase in the somatic spike is derived from the propagated axon initiated spike, and how the somatic spike threshold variance is affected by spike propagation.
27.  Application of a common kinetic formalism for synaptic models (Destexhe et al 1994)
Application to AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and GABAB receptors is given in a book chapter. The reference paper synthesizes a comprehensive general description of synaptic transmission with Markov kinetic models. This framework is applicable to modeling ion channels, synaptic release, and all receptors. Please see the references for more details. A simple introduction to this method is given in a seperate paper Destexhe et al Neural Comput 6:14-18 , 1994). More information and papers at http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr/Main.html and through email: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
28.  Ave. neuron model for slow-wave sleep in cortex Tatsuki 2016 Yoshida 2018 Rasmussen 2017 (all et al)
Averaged neuron(AN) model is a conductance-based (Hodgkin-Huxley type) neuron model which includes a mean-field approximation of a population of neurons. You can simulate previous models (AN model: Tatsuki et al., 2016 and SAN model: Yoshida et al., 2018), and various models with 'X model' based on channel and parameter modules. Also, intracellular and extracellular ion concentration can be taken into consideration using the Nernst equation (See Ramussen et al., 2017).
29.  BCM-like synaptic plasticity with conductance-based models (Narayanan Johnston, 2010)
" ... Although the BCM-like plasticity framework has been a useful formulation to understand synaptic plasticity and metaplasticity, a mechanism for the activity-dependent regulation of this modification threshold has remained an open question. In this simulation study based on CA1 pyramidal cells, we use a modification of the calcium-dependent hypothesis proposed elsewhere and show that a change in the hyperpolarization-activated, nonspecific-cation h current is capable of shifting the modification threshold. ..."
30.  Biologically Constrained Basal Ganglia model (BCBG model) (Lienard, Girard 2014)
We studied the physiology and function of the basal ganglia through the design of mean-field models of the whole basal ganglia. The parameterizations are optimized with multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to respect best a collection of numerous anatomical data and electrophysiological data. The main outcomes of our study are: • The strength of the GPe to GPi/SNr connection does not support opposed activities in the GPe and GPi/SNr. • STN and MSN target more the GPe than the GPi/SNr. • Selection arises from the structure of the basal ganglia, without properly segregated direct and indirect pathways and without specific inputs from pyramidal tract neurons of the cortex. Selection is enhanced when the projection from GPe to GPi/SNr has a diffuse pattern.
31.  Biophysical and phenomenological models of spike-timing dependent plasticity (Badoual et al. 2006)
"Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is a form of associative synaptic modification which depends on the respective timing of pre- and post-synaptic spikes. The biophysical mechanisms underlying this form of plasticity are currently not known. We present here a biophysical model which captures the characteristics of STDP, such as its frequency dependency, and the effects of spike pair or spike triplet interactions. ... A simplified phenomenological model is also derived..."
32.  Biophysically realistic neural modeling of the MEG mu rhythm (Jones et al. 2009)
"Variations in cortical oscillations in the alpha (7–14 Hz) and beta (15–29 Hz) range have been correlated with attention, working memory, and stimulus detection. The mu rhythm recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a prominent oscillation generated by Rolandic cortex containing alpha and beta bands. Despite its prominence, the neural mechanisms regulating mu are unknown. We characterized the ongoing MEG mu rhythm from a localized source in the finger representation of primary somatosensory (SI) cortex. Subjects showed variation in the relative expression of mu-alpha or mu-beta, which were nonoverlapping for roughly 50% of their respective durations on single trials. To delineate the origins of this rhythm, a biophysically principled computational neural model of SI was developed, with distinct laminae, inhibitory and excitatory neurons, and feedforward (FF, representative of lemniscal thalamic drive) and feedback (FB, representative of higher-order cortical drive or input from nonlemniscal thalamic nuclei) inputs defined by the laminar location of their postsynaptic effects. ..."
33.  Bursting in dopamine neurons (Li YX et al 1996)
"Burst firing of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta can be induced in vitro by the glutamate agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate. It has been suggested that the interburst hyperpolarization is due to Na+ extrusion by a ouabain-sensitive pump (Johnson et al. (1992) Science 258, 665-667). We formulate and explore a theoretical model, with a minimal number of currents, for this novel mechanism of burst generation. This minimal model is further developed into a more elaborate model based on observations of additional currents and hypotheses about their spatial distribution in dopaminergic neurons ... Responses of the model to a number of electrophysiological and pharmacological stimuli are consistent with known responses observed under similar conditions. ..."
34.  Ca+/HCN channel-dependent persistent activity in multiscale model of neocortex (Neymotin et al 2016)
"Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. ..."
35.  CA1 network model for place cell dynamics (Turi et al 2019)
Biophysical model of CA1 hippocampal region. The model simulates place cells/fields and explores the place cell dynamics as function of VIP+ interneurons.
36.  CA1 network model: interneuron contributions to epileptic deficits (Shuman et al 2019)
Temporal lobe epilepsy causes significant cognitive deficits in both humans and rodents, yet the specific circuit mechanisms underlying these deficits remain unknown. There are profound and selective interneuron death and axonal reorganization within the hippocampus of both humans and animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy. To assess the specific contribution of these mechanisms on spatial coding, we developed a biophysically constrained network model of the CA1 region that consists of different subtypes of interneurons. More specifically, our network consists of 150 cells, 130 excitatory pyramidal cells and 20 interneurons (Fig. 1A). To simulate place cell formation in the network model, we generated grid cell and place cell inputs from the Entorhinal Cortex (ECLIII) and CA3 regions, respectively, activated in a realistic manner as observed when an animal transverses a linear track. Realistic place fields emerged in a subpopulation of pyramidal cells (40-50%), in which similar EC and CA3 grid cell inputs converged onto distal/proximal apical and basal dendrites. The tuning properties of these cells are very similar to the ones observed experimentally in awake, behaving animals To examine the role of interneuron death and axonal reorganization in the formation and/or tuning properties of place fields we selectively varied the contribution of each interneuron type and desynchronized the two excitatory inputs. We found that desynchronized inputs were critical in reproducing the experimental data, namely the profound reduction in place cell numbers, stability and information content. These results demonstrate that the desynchronized firing of hippocampal neuronal populations contributes to poor spatial processing in epileptic mice, during behavior. Given the lack of experimental data on the selective contributions of interneuron death and axonal reorganization in spatial memory, our model findings predict the mechanistic effects of these alterations at the cellular and network levels.
37.  CA1 pyr cell: Inhibitory modulation of spatial selectivity+phase precession (Grienberger et al 2017)
Spatially uniform synaptic inhibition enhances spatial selectivity and temporal coding in CA1 place cells by suppressing broad out-of-field excitation.
38.  CA1 pyramidal cell receptor dependent cAMP dynamics (Chay et al. 2016)
We use a combination of live cell imaging and stochastic modeling of signaling pathways to investigate how noradrenergic receptor stimulation interacts with calcium to control cAMP, required for synaptic plasticity and memory in the hippocampus. Our simulation results explain the mechanism whereby prior noradrenergic receptor stimulation does not enhance the subsequent NMDA stimulated cAMP elevation. Specifically, our results demonstrate the the negative feedback loop from cAMP, through PKA, to PDE4 cannot explain the results, and that switching of the noradrenergic receptor from Gs to Gi is required.
39.  CA1 pyramidal neuron dendritic spine with plasticity (O`Donnell et al. 2011)
Biophysical model of a dendritic spine and adjacent dendrite with synapse. Model parameters adjusted to fit CA3-CA1 Shaffer collateral synapse data from literature. Model includes both electrical and Ca2+ dynamics, including AMPARs, NMDARs, 4 types of CaV channel, and leak conductance. Spine and synapse are plastic according to Ca2+ dependent rule. The aim of the model is to explore the effects of dendritic spine structural plasticity on the rules of synaptic plasticity.
40.  CA1 pyramidal neuron synaptic integration (Bloss et al. 2016)
"... We examined synaptic connectivity between molecularly defined inhibitory interneurons and CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites using correlative light-electron microscopy and large-volume array tomography. We show that interneurons can be highly selective in their connectivity to specific dendritic branch types and, furthermore, exhibit precisely targeted connectivity to the origin or end of individual branches. Computational simulations indicate that the observed subcellular targeting enables control over the nonlinear integration of synaptic input or the initiation and backpropagation of action potentials in a branchselective manner. Our results demonstrate that connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal cell dendrites is more precise and spatially segregated than previously appreciated, which may be a critical determinant of how inhibition shapes dendritic computation."
41.  CA1 pyramidal neuron synaptic integration (Li and Ascoli 2006, 2008)
The model shows how different input patterns (irregular & asynchronous, irregular & synchronous, regular & asynchronous, regular & synchronous) affect the neuron's output rate when 1000 synapses are distributed in the proximal apical dendritic tree of a hippocampus CA1 pyramidal neuron.
42.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: as a 2-layer NN and subthreshold synaptic summation (Poirazi et al 2003)
We developed a CA1 pyramidal cell model calibrated with a broad spectrum of in vitro data. Using simultaneous dendritic and somatic recordings, and combining results for two different response measures (peak vs. mean EPSP), two different stimulus formats (single shock vs. 50 Hz trains), and two different spatial integration conditions (within vs. between-branch summation), we found the cell's subthreshold responses to paired inputs are best described as a sum of nonlinear subunit responses, where the subunits correspond to different dendritic branches. In addition to suggesting a new type of experiment and providing testable predictions, our model shows how conclusions regarding synaptic arithmetic can be influenced by an array of seemingly innocuous experimental design choices.
43.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: Dendritic Na+ spikes are required for LTP at distal synapses (Kim et al 2015)
This model simulates the effects of dendritic sodium spikes initiated in distal apical dendrites on the voltage and the calcium dynamics revealed by calcium imaging. It shows that dendritic sodium spike promotes large and transient calcium influxes via NMDA receptor and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, which contribute to the induction of LTP at distal synapses.
44.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: dendritic spike initiation (Gasparini et al 2004)
NEURON mod files from the paper: Sonia Gasparini, Michele Migliore, and Jeffrey C. Magee On the initiation and propagation of dendritic spikes in CA1 pyramidal neurons, J. Neurosci., J. Neurosci. 24:11046-11056 (2004).
45.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: depolarization block (Bianchi et al. 2012)
NEURON files from the paper: On the mechanisms underlying the depolarization block in the spiking dynamics of CA1 pyramidal neurons by D.Bianchi, A. Marasco, A.Limongiello, C.Marchetti, H.Marie,B.Tirozzi, M.Migliore (2012). J Comput. Neurosci. In press. DOI: 10.1007/s10827-012-0383-y. Experimental findings shown that under sustained input current of increasing strength neurons eventually stop firing, entering a depolarization block. We analyze the spiking dynamics of CA1 pyramidal neuron models using the same set of ionic currents on both an accurate morphological reconstruction and on its reduction to a single-compartment. The results show the specic ion channel properties and kinetics that are needed to reproduce the experimental findings, and how their interplay can drastically modulate the neuronal dynamics and the input current range leading to depolarization block.
46.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: nonlinear a5-GABAAR controls synaptic NMDAR activation (Schulz et al 2018)
The study shows that IPSCs mediated by a5-subunit containing GABAA receptors are strongly outward-rectifying generating 4-fold larger conductances above -50?mV than at rest. Experiments and modeling show that synaptic activation of these receptors can very effectively control voltage-dependent NMDA-receptor activation in a spatiotemporally controlled manner in fine dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells. The files contain the NEURON code for Fig.8, Fig.S8 and Fig.S9 of the paper. The model is based on the model published by Bloss et al., 2017. Physiological properties of GABA synapses were modified as determined by optogenetic activation of inputs during voltage-clamp recordings in Schulz et al. 2018. Other changes include stochastic synaptic release and short-term synaptic plasticity. All changes of mechanisms and parameters are detailed in the Methods of the paper. Simulation can be run by starting start_simulation.hoc after running mknrndll. The files that model the individual figures have to be uncommented in start_simulation.hoc beforehand.
47.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: Persistent Na current mediates steep synaptic amplification (Hsu et al 2018)
This paper shows that persistent sodium current critically contributes to the subthreshold nonlinear dynamics of CA1 pyramidal neurons and promotes rapidly reversible conversion between place-cell and silent-cell in the hippocampus. A simple model built with realistic axo-somatic voltage-gated sodium channels in CA1 (Carter et al., 2012; Neuron 75, 1081–1093) demonstrates that the biophysics of persistent sodium current is sufficient to explain the synaptic amplification effects. A full model built previously (Grienberger et al., 2017; Nature Neuroscience, 20(3): 417–426) with detailed morphology, ion channel types and biophysical properties of CA1 place cells naturally reproduces the steep voltage dependence of synaptic responses.
48.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: synaptically-induced bAP predicts synapse location (Sterratt et al. 2012)
This is an adaptation of Poirazi et al.'s (2003) CA1 model that is used to measure BAP-induced voltage and calcium signals in spines after simulated Schaffer collateral synapse stimulation. In the model, the peak calcium concentration is highly correlated with soma-synapse distance under a number of physiologically-realistic suprathreshold stimulation regimes and for a range of dendritic morphologies. There are also simulations demonstrating that peak calcium can be used to set up a synaptic democracy in a homeostatic manner, whereby synapses regulate their synaptic strength on the basis of the difference between peak calcium and a uniform target value.
49.  CA1 stratum radiatum interneuron multicompartmental model (Katona et al. 2011)
The model examines dendritic NMDA-spike generation and propagation in the dendrites of CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons. It contains NMDA-channels in a clustered pattern on a dendrite and K-channels. The simulation shows the whole NMDA spike and the rising phase of the traces in separate windows.
50.  CA3 Network Model of Epileptic Activity (Sanjay et. al, 2015)
This computational study investigates how a CA3 neuronal network consisting of pyramidal cells, basket cells and OLM interneurons becomes epileptic when dendritic inhibition to pyramidal cells is impaired due to the dysfunction of OLM interneurons. After standardizing the baseline activity (theta-modulated gamma oscillations), systematic changes are made in the connectivities between the neurons, as a result of step-wise impairment of dendritic inhibition.
51.  Calcium influx during striatal upstates (Evans et al. 2013)
"... To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the relationship between calcium and AP timing, we have developed a realistic biophysical model of a medium spiny neuron (MSN). ... Using this model, we found that either the slow inactivation of dendritic sodium channels (NaSI) or the calcium inactivation of voltage-gated calcium channels (CDI) can cause high calcium corresponding to early APs and lower calcium corresponding to later APs. We found that only CDI can account for the experimental observation that sensitivity to AP timing is dependent on NMDA receptors. Additional simulations demonstrated a mechanism by which MSNs can dynamically modulate their sensitivity to AP timing and show that sensitivity to specifically timed pre- and postsynaptic pairings (as in spike timing-dependent plasticity protocols) is altered by the timing of the pairing within the upstate. …"
52.  Calcium response prediction in the striatal spines depending on input timing (Nakano et al. 2013)
We construct an electric compartment model of the striatal medium spiny neuron with a realistic morphology and predict the calcium responses in the synaptic spines with variable timings of the glutamatergic and dopaminergic inputs and the postsynaptic action potentials. The model was validated by reproducing the responses to current inputs and could predict the electric and calcium responses to glutamatergic inputs and back-propagating action potential in the proximal and distal synaptic spines during up and down states.
53.  Calcium waves and mGluR-dependent synaptic plasticity in CA1 pyr. neurons (Ashhad & Narayanan 2013)
A morphologically realistic, conductance-based model equipped with kinetic schemes that govern several calcium signalling modules and pathways in CA1 pyramidal neurons
54.  Central Nervous System tadpole model in Matlab and NEURON-Python (Ferrario et al, accepted)
This is the source code for three compuational models used for generating connectivity and swimming dynamics of spinal cord and hindbrain neurons in the Xenopus tadpoles using biological data. The model reproduces the initiation, continuation, termination and accelaration of forward swimming.
55.  Cerebellar cortex oscil. robustness from Golgi cell gap jncs (Simoes de Souza and De Schutter 2011)
" ... Previous one-dimensional network modeling of the cerebellar granular layer has been successfully linked with a range of cerebellar cortex oscillations observed in vivo. However, the recent discovery of gap junctions between Golgi cells (GoCs), which may cause oscillations by themselves, has raised the question of how gap-junction coupling affects GoC and granular-layer oscillations. To investigate this question, we developed a novel two-dimensional computational model of the GoC-granule cell (GC) circuit with and without gap junctions between GoCs. ..."
56.  Cerebellar granular layer (Maex and De Schutter 1998)
Circuit model of the granular layer representing a one-dimensional array of single-compartmental granule cells (grcs) and Golgi cells (Gocs). This paper examines the effects of feedback inhibition (grc -> Goc -> grc) versus feedforward inhibition (mossy fibre -> Goc -> grc) on synchronization and oscillatory behaviour.
57.  Cerebellar granule cell (Masoli et al 2020)
"The cerebellar granule cells (GrCs) are classically described as a homogeneous neuronal population discharging regularly without adaptation. We show that GrCs in fact generate diverse response patterns to current injection and synaptic activation, ranging from adaptation to acceleration of firing. Adaptation was predicted by parameter optimization in detailed computational models based on available knowledge on GrC ionic channels. The models also predicted that acceleration required additional mechanisms. We found that yet unrecognized TRPM4 currents specifically accounted for firing acceleration and that adapting GrCs outperformed accelerating GrCs in transmitting high-frequency mossy fiber (MF) bursts over a background discharge. This implied that GrC subtypes identified by their electroresponsiveness corresponded to specific neurotransmitter release probability values. Simulations showed that fine-tuning of pre- and post-synaptic parameters generated effective MF-GrC transmission channels, which could enrich the processing of input spike patterns and enhance spatio-temporal recoding at the cerebellar input stage."
58.  Cerebellar Model for the Optokinetic Response (Kim and Lim 2021)
We consider a cerebellar spiking neural network for the optokinetic response (OKR). Individual granule (GR) cells exhibit diverse spiking patterns which are in-phase, anti-phase, or complex out-of-phase with respect to their population-averaged firing activity. Then, these diversely-recoded signals via parallel fibers (PFs) from GR cells are effectively depressed by the error-teaching signals via climbing fibers from the inferior olive which are also in-phase ones. Synaptic weights at in-phase PF-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses of active GR cells are strongly depressed via strong long-term depression (LTD), while those at anti-phase and complex out-of-phase PF-PC synapses are weakly depressed through weak LTD. This kind of ‘‘effective’’ depression at the PF-PC synapses causes a big modulation in firings of PCs, which then exert effective inhibitory coordination on the vestibular nucleus (VN) neuron (which evokes OKR). For the firing of the VN neuron, the learning gain degree, corresponding to the modulation gain ratio, increases with increasing the learning cycle, and it saturates.
59.  Cerebellar nuclear neuron (Sudhakar et al., 2015)
"... In this modeling study, we investigate different forms of Purkinje neuron simple spike pause synchrony and its influence on candidate coding strategies in the cerebellar nuclei. That is, we investigate how different alignments of synchronous pauses in synthetic Purkinje neuron spike trains affect either time-locking or rate-changes in the downstream nuclei. We find that Purkinje neuron synchrony is mainly represented by changes in the firing rate of cerebellar nuclei neurons. ..."
60.  Cerebellar Nucleus Neuron (Steuber, Schultheiss, Silver, De Schutter & Jaeger, 2010)
This is the GENESIS 2.3 implementation of a multi-compartmental deep cerebellar nucleus (DCN) neuron model with a full dendritic morphology and appropriate active conductances. We generated a good match of our simulations with DCN current clamp data we recorded in acute slices, including the heterogeneity in the rebound responses. We then examined how inhibitory and excitatory synaptic input interacted with these intrinsic conductances to control DCN firing. We found that the output spiking of the model reflected the ongoing balance of excitatory and inhibitory input rates and that changing the level of inhibition performed an additive operation. Rebound firing following strong Purkinje cell input bursts was also possible, but only if the chloride reversal potential was more negative than -70 mV to allow de-inactivation of rebound currents. Fast rebound bursts due to T-type calcium current and slow rebounds due to persistent sodium current could be differentially regulated by synaptic input, and the pattern of these rebounds was further influenced by HCN current. Our findings suggest that active properties of DCN neurons could play a crucial role for signal processing in the cerebellum.
61.  Cerebellum granule cell FHF (Dover et al. 2016)
"Neurons in vertebrate central nervous systems initiate and conduct sodium action potentials in distinct subcellular compartments that differ architecturally and electrically. Here, we report several unanticipated passive and active properties of the cerebellar granule cell's unmyelinated axon. Whereas spike initiation at the axon initial segment relies on sodium channel (Nav)-associated fibroblast growth factor homologous factor (FHF) proteins to delay Nav inactivation, distal axonal Navs show little FHF association or FHF requirement for high-frequency transmission, velocity and waveforms of conducting action potentials. ...'
62.  Circadian rhythmicity shapes astrocyte morphology and neuronal function in CA1 (McCauley et al 2020)
Most animal species operate according to a 24-hour period set by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The rhythmic activity of the SCN modulates hippocampal-dependent memory, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that account for this effect remain largely unknown. In McCauley et al. 2020 [1], we identify cell-type specific structural and functional changes that occur with circadian rhythmicity in neurons and astrocytes in hippocampal area CA1. Pyramidal neurons change the surface expression of NMDA receptors. Astrocytes change their proximity clustered excitatory synaptic inputs, ultimately shaping hippocampal-dependent learning in vivo. We identify to synapses. Together, these phenomena alter glutamate clearance, receptor activation and integration of temporally corticosterone as a key contributor to changes in synaptic strength. These findings highlight important mechanisms through which neurons and astrocytes modify the molecular composition and structure of the synaptic environment, contribute to the local storage of information in the hippocampus and alter the temporal dynamics of cognitive processing. [1] "Circadian modulation of neurons and astrocytes controls synaptic plasticity in hippocampal area CA1" by J.P. McCauley, M.A. Petroccione, L.Y. D’Brant, G.C. Todd, N. Affinnih, J.J. Wisnoski, S. Zahid, S. Shree, A.A. Sousa, R.M. De Guzman, R. Migliore, A. Brazhe, R.D. Leapman, A. Khmaladze, A. Semyanov, D.G. Zuloaga, M. Migliore and A. Scimemi. Cell Reports (2020), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2020.108255
63.  Coincident glutamatergic depolarization effects on Cl- dynamics (Lombardi et al, 2021)
"... we used compartmental biophysical models of Cl- dynamics simulating either a simple ball-and-stick topology or a reconstructed CA3 neuron. These computational experiments demonstrated that glutamatergic co-stimulation enhances GABA receptor-mediated Cl- influx at low and attenuates or reverses the Cl- efflux at high initial [Cl-]i. The size of glutamatergic influence on GABAergic Cl--fluxes depends on the conductance, decay kinetics, and localization of glutamatergic inputs. Surprisingly, the glutamatergic shift in GABAergic Cl--fluxes is invariant to latencies between GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs over a substantial interval..."
64.  Coincident signals in Olfactory Bulb Granule Cell spines (Aghvami et al 2019)
"In the mammalian olfactory bulb, the inhibitory axonless granule cells (GCs) feature reciprocal synapses that interconnect them with the principal neurons of the bulb, mitral, and tufted cells. These synapses are located within large excitable spines that can generate local action potentials (APs) upon synaptic input (“spine spike”). Moreover, GCs can fire global APs that propagate throughout the dendrite. Strikingly, local postsynaptic Ca2+ entry summates mostly linearly with Ca2+ entry due to coincident global APs generated by glomerular stimulation, although some underlying conductances should be inactivated. We investigated this phenomenon by constructing a compartmental GC model to simulate the pairing of local and global signals as a function of their temporal separation ?t. These simulations yield strongly sublinear summation of spine Ca2+ entry for the case of perfect coincidence ?t = 0 ms. ..."
65.  Collection of simulated data from a thalamocortical network model (Glabska, Chintaluri, Wojcik 2017)
"A major challenge in experimental data analysis is the validation of analytical methods in a fully controlled scenario where the justification of the interpretation can be made directly and not just by plausibility. ... One solution is to use simulations of realistic models to generate ground truth data. In neuroscience, creating such data requires plausible models of neural activity, access to high performance computers, expertise and time to prepare and run the simulations, and to process the output. To facilitate such validation tests of analytical methods we provide rich data sets including intracellular voltage traces, transmembrane currents, morphologies, and spike times. ... The data were generated using the largest publicly available multicompartmental model of thalamocortical network (Traub et al. 2005), with activity evoked by different thalamic stimuli."
66.  Comparison of full and reduced globus pallidus models (Hendrickson 2010)
In this paper, we studied what features of realistic full model activity patterns can and cannot be preserved by morphologically reduced models. To this end, we reduced the morphological complexity of a full globus pallidus neuron model possessing active dendrites and compared its spontaneous and driven responses to those of the reduced models.
67.  Composite spiking network/neural field model of Parkinsons (Kerr et al 2013)
This code implements a composite model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The composite model consists of a leaky integrate-and-fire spiking neuronal network model being driven by output from a neural field model (instead of the more usual white noise drive). Three different sets of parameters were used for the field model: one with basal ganglia parameters based on data from healthy individuals, one based on data from individuals with PD, and one purely thalamocortical model. The aim of this model is to explore how the different dynamical patterns in each each of these field models affects the activity in the network model.
68.  Comprehensive models of human cortical pyramidal neurons (Eyal et al 2018)
"We present detailed models of pyramidal cells from human neocortex, including models on their excitatory synapses, dendritic spines, dendritic NMDA- and somatic/axonal Na+ spikes that provided new insights into signal processing and computational capabilities of these principal cells. Six human layer 2 and layer 3 pyramidal cells (HL2/L3 PCs) were modeled, integrating detailed anatomical and physiological data from both fresh and postmortem tissues from human temporal cortex. The models predicted particularly large AMPA- and NMDA- conductances per synaptic contact (0.88 nS and 1.31nS, respectively) and a steep dependence of the NMDA-conductance on voltage..."
69.  Computational analysis of NN activity and spatial reach of sharp wave-ripples (Canakci et al 2017)
Network oscillations of different frequencies, durations and amplitudes are hypothesized to coordinate information processing and transfer across brain areas. Among these oscillations, hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs) are one of the most prominent. SPW-Rs occurring in the hippocampus are suggested to play essential roles in memory consolidation as well as information transfer to the neocortex. To-date, most of the knowledge about SPW-Rs comes from experimental studies averaging responses from neuronal populations monitored by conventional microelectrodes. In this work, we investigate spatiotemporal characteristics of SPW-Rs and how microelectrode size and distance influence SPW-R recordings using a biophysical model of hippocampus. We also explore contributions from neuronal spikes and synaptic potentials to SPW-Rs based on two different types of network activity. Our study suggests that neuronal spikes from pyramidal cells contribute significantly to ripples while high amplitude sharp waves mainly arise from synaptic activity. Our simulations on spatial reach of SPW-Rs show that the amplitudes of sharp waves and ripples exhibit a steep decrease with distance from the network and this effect is more prominent for smaller area electrodes. Furthermore, the amplitude of the signal decreases strongly with increasing electrode surface area as a result of averaging. The relative decrease is more pronounced when the recording electrode is closer to the source of the activity. Through simulations of field potentials across a high-density microelectrode array, we demonstrate the importance of finding the ideal spatial resolution for capturing SPW-Rs with great sensitivity. Our work provides insights on contributions from spikes and synaptic potentials to SPW-Rs and describes the effect of measurement configuration on LFPs to guide experimental studies towards improved SPW-R recordings.
70.  Computer simulations of neuron-glia interactions mediated by ion flux (Somjen et al. 2008)
"... To examine the effect of glial K+ uptake, we used a model neuron equipped with Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl− conductances, ion pumps and ion exchangers, surrounded by interstitial space and glia. The glial membrane was either “passive”, incorporating only leak channels and an ion exchange pump, or it had rectifying K+ channels. We computed ion fluxes, concentration changes and osmotic volume changes. ... We conclude that voltage gated K+ currents can boost the effectiveness of the glial “potassium buffer” and that this buffer function is important even at moderate or low levels of excitation, but especially so in pathological states."
71.  Conditions of dominant effectiveness of distal dendrites (Korogod, Kulagina 1998)
The model illustrates and explains bistable spatial patterns of the current transfer effectiveness in the active dendrite with distributed (multiple) tonic excitatory, NMDA type, synaptic input.
72.  Cortex-Basal Ganglia-Thalamus network model (Kumaravelu et al. 2016)
" ... We developed a biophysical network model comprising of the closed loop cortical-basal ganglia-thalamus circuit representing the healthy and parkinsonian rat brain. The network properties of the model were validated by comparing responses evoked in basal ganglia (BG) nuclei by cortical (CTX) stimulation to published experimental results. A key emergent property of the model was generation of low-frequency network oscillations. Consistent with their putative pathological role, low-frequency oscillations in model BG neurons were exaggerated in the parkinsonian state compared to the healthy condition. ..."
73.  Cortical model with reinforcement learning drives realistic virtual arm (Dura-Bernal et al 2015)
We developed a 3-layer sensorimotor cortical network of consisting of 704 spiking model-neurons, including excitatory, fast-spiking and low-threshold spiking interneurons. Neurons were interconnected with AMPA/NMDA, and GABAA synapses. We trained our model using spike-timing-dependent reinforcement learning to control a virtual musculoskeletal human arm, with realistic anatomical and biomechanical properties, to reach a target. Virtual arm position was used to simultaneously control a robot arm via a network interface.
74.  Cortical network model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis (Bush et al 1999)
This simulation from Bush, Prince, and Miller 1999 shows the epileptiform response (Fig. 6C) to a brief single stimulation in a 500 cell network of multicompartment models, some of which have active dendrites. The results which I obtained under Redhat Linux is shown in result.gif. Original 1997 code from Paul Bush modified slightly by Bill Lytton to make it work with current version of NEURON (5.7.139). Thanks to Paul Bush and Ken Miller for making the code available.
75.  Current Dipole in Laminar Neocortex (Lee et al. 2013)
Laminar neocortical model in NEURON/Python, adapted from Jones et al 2009. https://bitbucket.org/jonescompneurolab/corticaldipole
76.  Deconstruction of cortical evoked potentials generated by subthalamic DBS (Kumaravelu et al 2018)
"... High frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) suppresses parkinsonian motor symptoms and modulates cortical activity. ... Cortical evoked potentials (cEP) generated by STN DBS reflect the response of cortex to subcortical stimulation, and the goal was to determine the neural origin of cEP using a two-step approach. First, we recorded cEP over ipsilateral primary motor cortex during different frequencies of STN DBS in awake healthy and unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned parkinsonian rats. Second, we used a biophysically-based model of the thalamocortical network to deconstruct the neural origin of the cEP. The in vivo cEP included short (R1), intermediate (R2) and long-latency (R3) responses. Model-based cortical responses to simulated STN DBS matched remarkably well the in vivo responses. R1 was generated by antidromic activation of layer 5 pyramidal neurons, while recurrent activation of layer 5 pyramidal neurons via excitatory axon collaterals reproduced R2. R3 was generated by polysynaptic activation of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons via the cortico-thalamic-cortical pathway. Antidromic activation of the hyperdirect pathway and subsequent intracortical and cortico-thalamo-cortical synaptic interactions were sufficient to generate cEP by STN DBS, and orthodromic activation through basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex pathways was not required. These results demonstrate the utility of cEP to determine the neural elements activated by STN DBS that might modulate cortical activity and contribute to the suppression of parkinsonian symptoms."
77.  Dendrites enable a robust mechanism for neuronal stimulus selectivity (Caze et al 2017)
"... Using a multi-subunit nonlinear model, we demonstrate that stimulus selectivity can arise from the spatial distribution of synapses. We propose this as a general mechanism for information processing by neurons possessing dendritic trees. Moreover, we show that this implementation of stimulus selectivity increases the neuron's robustness to synaptic and dendritic failure. ..."
78.  Dendritic action potentials and computation in human layer 2/3 cortical neurons (Gidon et al 2020)
This code reproduces figs 3 and S9 in Dendritic action potentials in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of the human neocortex.
79.  Dendritic Discrimination of Temporal Input Sequences (Branco et al. 2010)
Compartmental model of a layer 2/3 pyramidal cell in the rat somatosensory cortex, exploring NMDA-dependent sensitivity to the temporal sequence of synaptic activation.
80.  Dendritic spine geometry, spine apparatus organization: spatiotemporal Ca dynamics (Bell et al 2019)
" ... we systematically investigated the relationship between the shape and size of both the spine head and spine apparatus, a specialized endoplasmic reticulum compartment within the spine head, in modulating rapid calcium dynamics using mathematical modeling. ..."
81.  Dentate Gyrus Feed-forward inhibition (Ferrante et al. 2009)
In this paper, the model was used to show how that FFI can change a steeply sigmoidal input-output (I/O) curve into a double-sigmoid typical of buffer systems.
82.  Dentate Gyrus model including Granule cells with dendritic compartments (Chavlis et al 2017)
Here we investigate the role of dentate granule cell dendrites in pattern separation. The model consists of point neurons (Integrate and fire) and in principal neurons, the granule cells, we have incorporated various number of dendrites.
83.  DG adult-born granule cell: nonlinear a5-GABAARs control AP firing (Lodge et al, accepted)
GABA can depolarize immature neurons close to the action potential (AP) threshold in development and adult neurogenesis. Nevertheless, GABAergic synapses effectively inhibit AP firing in newborn granule cells of the adult hippocampus as early as 2 weeks post mitosis. Parvalbumin and dendrite-targeting somatostatin interneurons activate a5-subunit containing GABAA receptors (a5-GABAARs) in young neurons, which show a voltage dependent conductance profile with increasing conductance around the AP threshold. The present computational models show that the depolarized GABA reversal potential promotes NMDA receptor activation. However, the voltage-dependent conductance of a5-GABAARs in young neurons is crucial for inhibition of AP firing to generate balanced and sparse firing activity.
84.  Differential modulation of pattern and rate in a dopamine neuron model (Canavier and Landry 2006)
"A stylized, symmetric, compartmental model of a dopamine neuron in vivo shows how rate and pattern can be modulated either concurrently or differentially. If two or more parameters in the model are varied concurrently, the baseline firing rate and the extent of bursting become decorrelated, which provides an explanation for the lack of a tight correlation in vivo and is consistent with some independence of the mechanisms that generate baseline firing rates versus bursting. ..." See paper for more and details.
85.  Discrimination on behavioral time-scales mediated by reaction-diffusion in dendrites (Bhalla 2017)
Sequences of events are ubiquitous in sensory, motor, and cognitive function. Key computational operations, including pattern recognition, event prediction, and plasticity, involve neural discrimination of spatio-temporal sequences. Here we show that synaptically-driven reaction diffusion pathways on dendrites can perform sequence discrimination on behaviorally relevant time-scales. We used abstract signaling models to show that selectivity arises when inputs at successive locations are aligned with, and amplified by, propagating chemical waves triggered by previous inputs. We incorporated biological detail using sequential synaptic input onto spines in morphologically, electrically, and chemically detailed pyramidal neuronal models based on rat data.
86.  Distal inhibitory control of sensory-evoked excitation (Egger, Schmitt et al. 2015)
Model of a cortical layer (L) 2 pyramidal neuron embedded in an anatomically realistic network of two barrel columns in rat vibrissal cortex. This model is used to investigate the effects of spatially and temporally specific inhibition from L1 inhibitory interneurons on the sensory-evoked subthreshold responses of the L2 pyramidal neuron, and can be used to create simulation results underlying Figures 3D, 4B, 4C and 4E from (Egger, Schmitt et al. 2015).
87.  Distance-dependent synaptic strength in CA1 pyramidal neurons (Menon et al. 2013)
Menon et al. (2013) describes the experimentally-observed variation in synaptic AMPA and NMDA conductance as a function of distance from the soma. This model explores the effect of this variation on somatic EPSPs and dendritic spike initiation, as compared to the case of uniform AMPA and NMDA conductance.
88.  Distinct integration properties of noisy inputs in active dendritic subunits (Poleg-Polsky 2019)
The brain operates surprisingly well despite the noisy nature of individual neurons. The central mechanism for noise mitigation in the nervous system is thought to involve averaging over multiple noise-corrupted inputs. Subsequently, there has been considerable interest recently to identify noise structures that can be integrated linearly in a way that preserves reliable signal encoding. By analyzing realistic synaptic integration in biophysically accurate neuronal models, I report a complementary de-noising approach that is mediated by focal dendritic spikes. Dendritic spikes might seem to be unlikely candidates for noise reduction due to their miniscule integration compartments and poor averaging abilities. Nonetheless, the extra thresholding step introduced by dendritic spike generation increases neuronal tolerance for a broad category of noise structures, some of which cannot be resolved well with averaging. This property of active dendrites compensates for compartment size constraints and expands the repertoire of conditions that can be processed by neuronal populations.
89.  Distributed working memory in large-scale macaque brain model (Mejias and Wang, accepted)
This code simulates working memory in a large-scale cortical network of the macaque brain. The model is constrained by anatomical data and provides a simple framework to explain the widespread activation of cortical areas during working memory.
90.  Dopamine-modulated medium spiny neuron, reduced model (Humphries et al. 2009)
We extended Izhikevich's reduced model of the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) to account for dopaminergic modulation of its intrinsic ion channels and synaptic inputs. We tuned our D1 and D2 receptor MSN models using data from a recent (Moyer et al, 2007) large-scale compartmental model. Our new models capture the input-output relationships for both current injection and spiking input with remarkable accuracy, despite the order of magnitude decrease in system size. They also capture the paired pulse facilitation shown by MSNs. Our dopamine models predict that synaptic effects dominate intrinsic effects for all levels of D1 and D2 receptor activation. Our analytical work on these models predicts that the MSN is never bistable. Nonetheless, these MSN models can produce a spontaneously bimodal membrane potential similar to that recently observed in vitro following application of NMDA agonists. We demonstrate that this bimodality is created by modelling the agonist effects as slow, irregular and massive jumps in NMDA conductance and, rather than a form of bistability, is due to the voltage-dependent blockade of NMDA receptors
91.  Dopaminergic cell bursting model (Kuznetsov et al 2006)
Dopaminergic neurons of the midbrain fire spontaneously at rates <10/s and ordinarily will not exceed this range even when driven with somatic current injection. During spontaneous bursting of dopaminergic neurons in vivo, bursts related to reward expectation in behaving animals, and bursts generated by dendritic application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) agonists, transient firing attains rates well above this range. We suggest a way such highfrequency firing may occur in response to dendritic NMDA receptor activation. We have extended the coupled oscillator model of the dopaminergic neuron, which represents the soma and dendrites as electrically coupled compartments with different natural spiking frequencies, by addition of dendritic AMPA (voltage-independent) or NMDA (voltage-dependent) synaptic conductance. Both soma and dendrites contain a simplified version of the calcium-potassium mechanism known to be the mechanism for slow spontaneous oscillation and background firing in dopaminergic cells. We show that because of its voltage dependence, NMDA receptor activation acts to amplify the effect on the soma of the high-frequency oscillation of the dendrites, which is normally too weak to exert a large influence on the overall oscillation frequency of the neuron.
92.  Duration-tuned neurons from the inferior colliculus of vertebrates (Aubie et al. 2012)
These models reproduce the responses of duration-tuned neurons in the auditory midbrain of the big brown bat, the rat, the mouse and the frog (Aubie et al. 2012). They are written in the Python interface to NEURON and a subset of the figures from Aubie et al. (2012) are pre-set in run.py (raw data is generated and a separate graphing program must be used to visualize the results).
93.  Dynamic cortical interlaminar interactions (Carracedo et al. 2013)
"... Here we demonstrate the mechanism underlying a purely neocortical delta rhythm generator and show a remarkable laminar, cell subtype and local subcircuit delineation between delta and nested theta rhythms. We show that spike timing during delta-nested theta rhythms controls an iterative, reciprocal interaction between deep and superficial cortical layers resembling the unsupervised learning processes proposed for laminar neural networks by Hinton and colleagues ... and mimicking the alternating cortical dynamics of sensory and memory processing during wakefulness."
94.  Effects of increasing CREB on storage and recall processes in a CA1 network (Bianchi et al. 2014)
Several recent results suggest that boosting the CREB pathway improves hippocampal-dependent memory in healthy rodents and restores this type of memory in an AD mouse model. However, not much is known about how CREB-dependent neuronal alterations in synaptic strength, excitability and LTP can boost memory formation in the complex architecture of a neuronal network. Using a model of a CA1 microcircuit, we investigate whether hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron properties altered by increasing CREB activity may contribute to improve memory storage and recall. With a set of patterns presented to a network, we find that the pattern recall quality under AD-like conditions is significantly better when boosting CREB function with respect to control. The results are robust and consistent upon increasing the synaptic damage expected by AD progression, supporting the idea that the use of CREB-based therapies could provide a new approach to treat AD.
95.  Effects of KIR current inactivation in NAc Medium Spiny Neurons (Steephen and Manchanda 2009)
"Inward rectifying potassium (KIR) currents in medium spiny (MS) neurons of nucleus accumbens inactivate significantly in ~40% of the neurons but not in the rest, which may lead to differences in input processing by these two groups. Using a 189-compartment computational model of the MS neuron, we investigate the influence of this property using injected current as well as spatiotemporally distributed synaptic inputs. Our study demonstrates that KIR current inactivation facilitates depolarization, firing frequency and firing onset in these neurons. ..."
96.  Effects of neural morphology on global and focal NMDA-spikes (Poleg-Polsky 2015)
This entry contains the NEURON files required to recreate figures 4-8 of the paper "Effects of Neural Morphology and Input Distribution on Synaptic Processing by Global and Focal NMDA-spikes" by Alon Poleg-Polsky
97.  Effects of spinal cord stimulation on WDR dorsal horn network (Zhang et al 2014)
" ... To study the mechanisms underlying SCS (Spinal cord stimulation), we constructed a biophysically-based network model of the dorsal horn circuit consisting of interconnected dorsal horn interneurons and a wide dynamic range (WDR) projection neuron and representations of both local and surround receptive field inhibition. We validated the network model by reproducing cellular and network responses relevant to pain processing including wind-up, A-fiber mediated inhibition, and surround receptive field inhibition. ..." See paper for more.
98.  Efficient simulation environment for modeling large-scale cortical processing (Richert et al. 2011)
"We have developed a spiking neural network simulator, which is both easy to use and computationally efficient, for the generation of large-scale computational neuroscience models. The simulator implements current or conductance based Izhikevich neuron networks, having spike-timing dependent plasticity and short-term plasticity. ..."
99.  Electrostimulation to reduce synaptic scaling driven progression of Alzheimers (Rowan et al. 2014)
"... As cells die and synapses lose their drive, remaining cells suffer an initial decrease in activity. Neuronal homeostatic synaptic scaling then provides a feedback mechanism to restore activity. ... The scaling mechanism increases the firing rates of remaining cells in the network to compensate for decreases in network activity. However, this effect can itself become a pathology, ... Here, we present a mechanistic explanation of how directed brain stimulation might be expected to slow AD progression based on computational simulations in a 470-neuron biomimetic model of a neocortical column. ... "
100.  Emergence of physiological oscillation frequencies in neocortex simulations (Neymotin et al. 2011)
"Coordination of neocortical oscillations has been hypothesized to underlie the "binding" essential to cognitive function. However, the mechanisms that generate neocortical oscillations in physiological frequency bands remain unknown. We hypothesized that interlaminar relations in neocortex would provide multiple intermediate loops that would play particular roles in generating oscillations, adding different dynamics to the network. We simulated networks from sensory neocortex using 9 columns of event-driven rule-based neurons wired according to anatomical data and driven with random white-noise synaptic inputs. ..."
101.  Emergent properties of networks of biological signaling pathways (Bhalla, Iyengar 1999)
Biochemical signaling networks were constructed with experimentally obtained constants and analyzed by computational methods to understand their role in complex biological processes. These networks exhibit emergent properties such as integration of signals across multiple time scales, generation of distinct outputs depending on input strength and duration, and self-sustaining feedback loops. Properties of signaling networks raise the possibility that information for "learned behavior" of biological systems may be stored within intracellular biochemical reactions that comprise signaling pathways.
102.  Encoding and retrieval in a model of the hippocampal CA1 microcircuit (Cutsuridis et al. 2009)
This NEURON code implements a small network model (100 pyramidal cells and 4 types of inhibitory interneuron) of storage and recall of patterns in the CA1 region of the mammalian hippocampus. Patterns of PC activity are stored either by a predefined weight matrix generated by Hebbian learning, or by STDP at CA3 Schaffer collateral AMPA synapses.
103.  Endocannabinoid dynamics gate spike-timing dependent depression and potentiation (Cui et al 2016)
The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is considered involved in synaptic depression. Recent reports have also linked eCBs to synaptic potentiation. However it is not known how eCB signaling may support such bidirectionality. To question the mechanisms of this phenomena in spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at corticostriatal synapses, we combined electrophysiology experiments with biophysical modeling. We demonstrate that STDP is controlled by eCB levels and dynamics: prolonged and moderate levels of eCB lead to eCB-mediated long-term depression (eCB-tLTD) while short and large eCB transients produce eCB-mediated long-term potentiation (eCB-tLTP). Therefore, just like neurotransmitters glutamate or GABA, eCB form a bidirectional system.
104.  Excitability of DA neurons and their regulation by synaptic input (Morozova et al. 2016a, 2016b)
This code contains conductance-based models of Dopaminergic (DA) and GABAergic neurons, used in Morozova et al 2016 PLOS Computational Biology paper in order to study the type of excitability of the DA neurons and how it is influenced by the intrinsic and synaptic currents. We identified the type of excitability by calculating bifurcation diagrams and F-I curves using XPP file. This model was also used in Morozova et al 2016 J. Neurophysiology paper in order to study the effect of synchronization in GABAergic inputs on the firing dynamics of the DA neuron.
105.  Excitatory synaptic interactions in pyramidal neuron dendrites (Behabadi et al. 2012)
" ... We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. ..."
106.  Excitotoxic loss of dopaminergic cells in PD (Muddapu et al 2019)
"... A couple of the proposed mechanisms, however, show potential for the development of a novel line of PD (Parkinson's disease) therapeutics. One of these mechanisms is the peculiar metabolic vulnerability of SNc (Substantia Nigra pars compacta) cells compared to other dopaminergic clusters; the other is the SubThalamic Nucleus (STN)-induced excitotoxicity in SNc. To investigate the latter hypothesis computationally, we developed a spiking neuron network-model of SNc-STN-GPe system. In the model, prolonged stimulation of SNc cells by an overactive STN leads to an increase in ‘stress’ variable; when the stress in a SNc neuron exceeds a stress threshold, the neuron dies. The model shows that the interaction between SNc and STN involves a positive-feedback due to which, an initial loss of SNc cells that crosses a threshold causes a runaway-effect, leading to an inexorable loss of SNc cells, strongly resembling the process of neurodegeneration. The model further suggests a link between the two aforementioned mechanisms of SNc cell loss. Our simulation results show that the excitotoxic cause of SNc cell loss might initiate by weak-excitotoxicity mediated by energy deficit, followed by strong-excitotoxicity, mediated by a disinhibited STN. A variety of conventional therapies were simulated to test their efficacy in slowing down SNc cell loss. Among them, glutamate inhibition, dopamine restoration, subthalamotomy and deep brain stimulation showed superior neuroprotective-effects in the proposed model."
107.  Functional consequences of cortical circuit abnormalities on gamma in schizophrenia (Spencer 2009)
"Schizophrenia is characterized by cortical circuit abnormalities, which might be reflected in gamma-frequency (30–100 Hz) oscillations in the electroencephalogram. Here we used a computational model of cortical circuitry to examine the effects that neural circuit abnormalities might have on gamma generation and network excitability. The model network consisted of 1000 leaky integrateand- fi re neurons with realistic connectivity patterns and proportions of neuron types [pyramidal cells (PCs), regular-spiking inhibitory interneurons, and fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs)]. ... The results of this study suggest that a multimodal approach, combining non-invasive neurophysiological and structural measures, might be able to distinguish between different neural circuit abnormalities in schizophrenia patients. ..."
108.  Gamma genesis in the basolateral amygdala (Feng et al 2019)
Using in vitro and in vivo data we develop the first large-scale biophysically and anatomically realistic model of the basolateral amygdala nucleus (BL), which reproduces the dynamics of the in vivo local field potential (LFP). Significantly, it predicts that BL intrinsically generates the transient gamma oscillations observed in vivo. The model permitted exploration of the poorly understood synaptic mechanisms underlying gamma genesis in BL, and the model's ability to compute LFPs at arbitrary numbers of recording sites provided insights into the characteristics of the spatial properties of gamma bursts. Furthermore, we show how gamma synchronizes principal cells to overcome their low firing rates while simultaneously promoting competition, potentially impacting their afferent selectivity and efferent drive, and thus emotional behavior.
109.  Gating of steering signals through phasic modulation of reticulospinal neurons (Kozlov et al. 2014)
" ... We use the lamprey as a model for investigating the role of this phasic modulation of the reticulospinal activity, because the brainstem–spinal cord networks are known down to the cellular level in this phylogenetically oldest extant vertebrate. We describe how the phasic modulation of reticulospinal activity from the spinal CPG ensures reliable steering/turning commands without the need for a very precise timing of on- or offset, by using a biophysically detailed large-scale (19,600 model neurons and 646,800 synapses) computational model of the lamprey brainstem–spinal cord network. To verify that the simulated neural network can control body movements, including turning, the spinal activity is fed to a mechanical model of lamprey swimming. ..."
110.  Global and multiplexed dendritic computations under in vivo-like conditions (Ujfalussy et al 2018)
"The input-output transformation of neurons under in vivo conditions is unknown. Ujfalussy et al. use a model-based approach to show that linear integration with a single global dendritic nonlinearity can accurately predict the response of neurons to naturalistic synaptic input patterns."
111.  Glutamate mediated dendritic and somatic plateau potentials in cortical L5 pyr cells (Gao et al '20)
Our model was built on a reconstructed Layer 5 pyramidal neuron of the rat medial prefrontal cortex, and constrained by 4 sets of experimental data: (i) voltage waveforms obtained at the site of the glutamatergic input in distal basal dendrite, including initial sodium spikelet, fast rise, plateau phase and abrupt collapse of the plateau; (ii) a family of voltage traces describing dendritic membrane responses to gradually increasing intensity of glutamatergic stimulation; (iii) voltage waveforms of backpropagating action potentials in basal dendrites (Antic, 2003); and (iv) the change of backpropagating action potential amplitude in response to drugs that block Na+ or K+ channels (Acker and Antic, 2009). Both, synaptic AMPA/NMDA and extrasynaptic NMDA inputs were placed on basal dendrites to model the induction of local regenerative potentials termed "glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials". The active properties of the cell were tuned to match the voltage waveform, amplitude and duration of experimentally observed plateau potentials. The effects of input location, receptor conductance, channel properties and membrane time constant during plateau were explored. The new model predicted that during dendritic plateau potential the somatic membrane time constant is reduced. This and other model predictions were then tested in real neurons. Overall, the results support our theoretical framework that dendritic plateau potentials bring neuronal cell body into a depolarized state ("UP state"), which lasts 200 - 500 ms, or more. Plateau potentials profoundly change neuronal state -- a plateau potential triggered in one basal dendrite depolarizes the soma and shortens membrane time constant, making the cell more susceptible to action potential firing triggered by other afferent inputs. Plateau potentials may allow cortical pyramidal neurons to tune into ongoing network activity and potentially enable synchronized firing, to form active neural ensembles.
112.  Granule Cells of the Olfactory Bulb (Simoes_De_Souza et al. 2014)
Electrical responses of three classes of granule cells of the olfactory bulb to synaptic activation in different dendritic locations. The constructed models were based on morphological detailed compartmental reconstructions of three granule cell classes of the olfactory bulb with active dendrites described by Bhalla and Bower (J. Neurophysiol. 69: 1948-1965, 1993) and dendritic spine distributions described by Woolf et al. (J. Neurosci. 11: 1837-1854, 1991). The computational studies with the model neurons showed that different quantities of spines have to be activated in each dendritic region to induce an action potential, which always was originated in the active terminal dendrites, independently of the location of the stimuli and the morphology of the dendritic tree.
113.  Heterosynaptic Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (Hiratani & Fukai 2017)
"The balance between excitatory and inhibitory inputs is a key feature of cortical dynamics. Such a balance is arguably preserved in dendritic branches, yet its underlying mechanism and functional roles remain unknown. In this study, we developed computational models of heterosynaptic spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) to show that the excitatory/inhibitory balance in dendritic branches is robustly achieved through heterosynaptic interactions between excitatory and inhibitory synapses. The model reproduces key features of experimental heterosynaptic STDP well, and provides analytical insights. ..."
114.  Hierarchical network model of perceptual decision making (Wimmer et al 2015)
Neuronal variability in sensory cortex predicts perceptual decisions. To investigate the interaction of bottom-up and top-down mechanisms during the decision process, we developed a hierarchical network model. The network consists of two circuits composed of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons: an integration circuit (e.g. LIP, FEF) and a sensory circuit (MT), recurrently coupled via bottom-up feedforward connections and top-down feedback connections. The integration circuit accumulates sensory evidence and produces a binary categorization due to winner-take-all competition between two decision-encoding populations (X.J. Wang, Neuron, 2002). The sensory circuit is a balanced randomly connected EI-network, that contains neural populations selective to opposite directions of motion. We have used this model to simulate a standard two-alternative forced-choice motion discrimination task.
115.  High frequency oscillations in a hippocampal computational model (Stacey et al. 2009)
"... Using a physiological computer model of hippocampus, we investigate random synaptic activity (noise) as a potential initiator of HFOs (high-frequency oscillations). We explore parameters necessary to produce these oscillations and quantify the response using the tools of stochastic resonance (SR) and coherence resonance (CR). ... Our results show that, under normal coupling conditions, synaptic noise was able to produce gamma (30–100 Hz) frequency oscillations. Synaptic noise generated HFOs in the ripple range (100–200 Hz) when the network had parameters similar to pathological findings in epilepsy: increased gap junctions or recurrent synaptic connections, loss of inhibitory interneurons such as basket cells, and increased synaptic noise. ... We propose that increased synaptic noise and physiological coupling mechanisms are sufficient to generate gamma oscillations and that pathologic changes in noise and coupling similar to those in epilepsy can produce abnormal ripples."
116.  Hippocampal CA3 thorny and a-thorny principal neuron models (Linaro et al in review)
This repository contains two populations of biophysically detailed models of murine hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons based on the two principal cell types that comprise this region. They are the result of a data-driven approach aimed at optimizing the model parameters by utilizing high-resolution morphological reconstructions and patch-clamp electrophysiology data together with a multi-objective optimization algorithm. The models quantitatively match the cell type-specific firing phenotypes and recapitulate the intrinsic population-level variability observed in the data. Additionally, the conductance values found by the optimization algorithm are consistent with differentially expressed ion channel genes in single-cell transcriptomic data for the two cell types. The models have further been employed to investigate the cell type-specific biophysical properties involved in the generation of complex-spiking output driven by synaptic input and to show that a-thorny bursting cells are capable of encoding more information in their firing output than their counterparts, thorny regular spiking neurons. Reference: Linaro D, Levy MJ, and Hunt, DL. Cell type-specific mechanisms of information transfer in data-driven biophysical models of hippocampal CA3 principal neurons. (2022) PLOS Computational Biology
117.  Hotspots of dendritic spine turnover facilitates new spines and NN sparsity (Frank et al 2018)
Model for the following publication: Adam C. Frank, Shan Huang, Miou Zhou, Amos Gdalyahu, George Kastellakis, Panayiota Poirazi, Tawnie K. Silva, Ximiao Wen, Joshua T. Trachtenberg, and Alcino J. Silva Hotspots of Dendritic Spine Turnover Facilitate Learning-related Clustered Spine Addition and Network Sparsity
118.  Human tactile FA1 neurons (Hay and Pruszynski 2020)
"... we show that synaptic integration across the complex signals from the first-order neuronal population could underlie human ability to accurately (< 3°) and rapidly process the orientation of edges moving across the fingertip. We first derive spiking models of human first-order tactile neurons that fit and predict responses to moving edges with high accuracy. We then use the model neurons in simulating the peripheral neuronal population that innervates a fingertip. We train classifiers performing synaptic integration across the neuronal population activity, and show that synaptic integration across first-order neurons can process edge orientations with high acuity and speed. ... our models suggest that integration of fast-decaying (AMPA-like) synaptic inputs within short timescales is critical for discriminating fine orientations, whereas integration of slow-decaying (NMDA-like) synaptic inputs supports discrimination of coarser orientations and maintains robustness over longer timescales"
119.  Ih tunes oscillations in an In Silico CA3 model (Neymotin et al. 2013)
" ... We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells), contained type-appropriate isoforms of Ih. Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket Ih allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal Ih also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC) and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via Ih’s ability to set pyramidal excitability. ..."
120.  In silico hippocampal modeling for multi-target pharmacotherapy in schizophrenia (Sherif et al 2020)
"Using a hippocampal CA3 computer model with 1200 neurons, we examined the effects of alterations in NMDAR, HCN (Ih current), and GABAAR on information flow (measured with normalized transfer entropy), and in gamma activity in local field potential (LFP). We found that altering NMDARs, GABAAR, Ih, individually or in combination, modified information flow in an inverted-U shape manner, with information flow reduced at low and high levels of these parameters. Theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling also had an inverted-U shape relationship with NMDAR augmentation. The strong information flow was associated with an intermediate level of synchrony, seen as an intermediate level of gamma activity in the LFP, and an intermediate level of pyramidal cell excitability"
121.  In vivo imaging of dentate gyrus mossy cells in behaving mice (Danielson et al 2017)
Mossy cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus constitute a major excitatory principal cell type in the mammalian hippocampus, however, it remains unknown how these cells behave in vivo. Here, we have used two-photon Ca2+ imaging to monitor the activity of mossy cells in awake, behaving mice. We find that mossy cells are significantly more active than dentate granule cells in vivo, exhibit significant spatial tuning during head-fixed spatial navigation, and undergo robust remapping of their spatial representations in response to contextual manipulation. Our results provide the first characterization of mossy cells in the behaving animal and demonstrate their active participation in spatial coding and contextual representation.
122.  Interacting synaptic conductances during, distorting, voltage clamp (Poleg-Polsky and Diamond 2011)
This simulation examines the accuracy of the voltage clamp technique in detecting the excitatory and the inhibitory components of the synaptic drive.
123.  Intracortical synaptic potential modulation by presynaptic somatic potential (Shu et al. 2006, 2007)
" ... Here we show that the voltage fluctuations associated with dendrosomatic synaptic activity propagate significant distances along the axon, and that modest changes in the somatic membrane potential of the presynaptic neuron modulate the amplitude and duration of axonal action potentials and, through a Ca21- dependent mechanism, the average amplitude of the postsynaptic potential evoked by these spikes. These results indicate that synaptic activity in the dendrite and soma controls not only the pattern of action potentials generated, but also the amplitude of the synaptic potentials that these action potentials initiate in local cortical circuits, resulting in synaptic transmission that is a mixture of triggered and graded (analogue) signals."
124.  Irregular spiking in NMDA-driven prefrontal cortex neurons (Durstewitz and Gabriel 2006)
Slow N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) synaptic currents are assumed to strongly contribute to the persistently elevated firing rates observed in prefrontal cortex (PFC) during working memory. During persistent activity, spiking of many neurons is highly irregular. ... The highest interspike-interval (ISI) variability occurred in a transition regime where the subthreshold membrane potential distribution shifts from mono- to bimodality, ... Predictability within irregular ISI series was significantly higher than expected from a noise-driven linear process, indicating that it might best be described through complex (potentially chaotic) nonlinear deterministic processes. Accordingly, the phenomena observed in vitro could be reproduced in purely deterministic biophysical model neurons. High spiking irregularity in these models emerged within a chaotic, close-to-bifurcation regime characterized by a shift of the membrane potential distribution from mono- to bimodality and by similar ISI return maps as observed in vitro. ... NMDA-induced irregular dynamics may have important implications for computational processes during working memory and neural coding.
125.  Ketamine disrupts theta modulation of gamma in a computer model of hippocampus (Neymotin et al 2011)
"Abnormalities in oscillations have been suggested to play a role in schizophrenia. We studied theta-modulated gamma oscillations in a computer model of hippocampal CA3 in vivo with and without simulated application of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist and psychotomimetic. Networks of 1200 multi-compartment neurons (pyramidal, basket and oriens-lacunosum moleculare, OLM, cells) generated theta and gamma oscillations from intrinsic network dynamics: basket cells primarily generated gamma and amplified theta, while OLM cells strongly contributed to theta. ..."
126.  Kinetic NMDA receptor model (Kampa et al 2004)
This kinetic NMDA receptor model is based on voltage-clamp recordings of NMDA receptor-mediated currents in nucleated patches of rat neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons (Kampa et al 2004 J Physiol), this model was fit with AxoGraph directly to experimental recordings in order to obtain the optimal values for the parameters. The demo shows the behaviour of a kinetic NMDA receptor model reproducing the data in figure 2. The NMDA receptor model uses realistic rates of magnesium block and its effects on channel desensitisation. Presynaptic transmitter release is necessary for glutamate binding to the receptor. This model was written by Bjoern Kampa, Canberra, 2004.
127.  Kinetic synaptic models applicable to building networks (Destexhe et al 1998)
Simplified AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and GABAB receptor models useful for building networks are described in a book chapter. One reference paper synthesizes a comprehensive general description of synaptic transmission with Markov kinetic models which is applicable to modeling ion channels, synaptic release, and all receptors. Also a simple introduction to this method is given in a seperate paper Destexhe et al Neural Comput 6:14-18 , 1994). More information and papers at http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr/Main.html and through email: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
128.  KV1 channel governs cerebellar output to thalamus (Ovsepian et al. 2013)
The output of the cerebellum to the motor axis of the central nervous system is orchestrated mainly by synaptic inputs and intrinsic pacemaker activity of deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) projection neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that the soma of these cells is enriched with KV1 channels produced by mandatory multi-merization of KV1.1, 1.2 alpha andKV beta2 subunits. Being constitutively active, the K+ current (IKV1) mediated by these channels stabilizes the rate and regulates the temporal precision of self-sustained firing of these neurons. ... Through the use of multi-compartmental modelling and ... the physiological significance of the described functions for processing and communication of information from the lateral DCN to thalamic relay nuclei is established.
129.  L5 PFC microcircuit used to study persistent activity (Papoutsi et al. 2014, 2013)
Using a heavily constrained biophysical model of a L5 PFC microcircuit we investigate the mechanisms that underlie persistent activity emergence (ON) and termination (OFF) and search for the minimum network size required for expressing these states within physiological regimes.
130.  L5 PFC pyramidal neurons (Papoutsi et al. 2017)
" ... Here, we use a modeling approach to investigate whether and how the morphology of the basal tree mediates the functional output of neurons. We implemented 57 basal tree morphologies of layer 5 prefrontal pyramidal neurons of the rat and identified morphological types which were characterized by different response features, forming distinct functional types. These types were robust to a wide range of manipulations (distribution of active ionic mechanisms, NMDA conductance, somatic and apical tree morphology or the number of activated synapses) and supported different temporal coding schemes at both the single neuron and the microcircuit level. We predict that the basal tree morphological diversity among neurons of the same class mediates their segregation into distinct functional pathways. ..."
131.  Large scale model of the olfactory bulb (Yu et al., 2013)
The readme file currently contains links to the results for all the 72 odors investigated in the paper, and the movie showing the network activity during learning of odor k3-3 (an aliphatic ketone).
132.  Large scale neocortical model for PGENESIS (Crone et al 2019)
This is model code for a large scale neocortical model based on Traub et al. (2005), modified to run on PGENESIS on supercomputing resources. "In this paper (Crone et al 2019), we evaluate the computational performance of the GEneral NEural SImulation System (GENESIS) for large scale simulations of neural networks. While many benchmark studies have been performed for large scale simulations with leaky integrate-and-fire neurons or neuronal models with only a few compartments, this work focuses on higher fidelity neuronal models represented by 50–74 compartments per neuron. ..."
133.  Layer V PFC pyramidal neuron used to study persistent activity (Sidiropoulou & Poirazi 2012)
"... Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS) and an intrinsic bursting (IB) model neuron. ... Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given stimulus that code for its ability to induce persistent activity and predict differential roles of RS and IB neurons in persistent activity expression. "
134.  Layer V pyramidal cell functions and schizophrenia genetics (Mäki-Marttunen et al 2019)
Study on how GWAS-identified risk genes of shizophrenia affect excitability and integration of inputs in thick-tufted layer V pyramidal cells
135.  Leaky Integrate and Fire Neuron Model of Context Integration (Calvin, Redish accepted)
The maintenance of the contextual information has been shown to be sensitive to changes in excitation-inhbition (EI) balance. We constructed a multi-structure, biophysically-realistic agent that could perform context-integration as is assessed by the dot probe expectancy task. The agent included a perceptual network, a working memory network, and a decision making system and was capable of successfully performing the dot probe expectancy task. Systemic manipulation of the agent’s EI balance produced localized dysfunction of the memory structure, which resulted in schizophrenia-like deficits at context integration.
136.  Learning intrinsic excitability in Medium Spiny Neurons (Scheler 2014)
"We present an unsupervised, local activation-dependent learning rule for intrinsic plasticity (IP) which affects the composition of ion channel conductances for single neurons in a use-dependent way. We use a single-compartment conductance-based model for medium spiny striatal neurons in order to show the effects of parameterization of individual ion channels on the neuronal membrane potential-curent relationship (activation function). We show that parameter changes within the physiological ranges are sufficient to create an ensemble of neurons with significantly different activation functions. ... "
137.  Levodopa-Induced Toxicity in Parkinson's Disease (Muddapu et al, 2022)
"... We present a systems-level computational model of SNc-striatum, which will help us understand the mechanism behind neurodegeneration postulated above and provide insights into developing disease-modifying therapeutics. It was observed that SNc terminals are more vulnerable to energy deficiency than SNc somas. During L-DOPA therapy, it was observed that higher L-DOPA dosage results in increased loss of terminals in SNc. It was also observed that co-administration of L-DOPA and glutathione (antioxidant) evades L-DOPA-induced toxicity in SNc neurons. Our proposed model of the SNc-striatum system is the first of its kind, where SNc neurons were modeled at a biophysical level, and striatal neurons were modeled at a spiking level. We show that our proposed model was able to capture L-DOPA-induced toxicity in SNc, caused by energy deficiency."
138.  Linear vs non-linear integration in CA1 oblique dendrites (Gómez González et al. 2011)
The hippocampus in well known for its role in learning and memory processes. The CA1 region is the output of the hippocampal formation and pyramidal neurons in this region are the elementary units responsible for the processing and transfer of information to the cortex. Using this detailed single neuron model, it is investigated the conditions under which individual CA1 pyramidal neurons process incoming information in a complex (non-linear) as opposed to a passive (linear) manner. This detailed compartmental model of a CA1 pyramidal neuron is based on one described previously (Poirazi, 2003). The model was adapted to five different reconstructed morphologies for this study, and slightly modified to fit the experimental data of (Losonczy, 2006), and to incorporate evidence in pyramidal neurons for the non-saturation of NMDA receptor-mediated conductances by single glutamate pulses. We first replicate the main findings of (Losonczy, 2006), including the very brief window for nonlinear integration using single-pulse stimuli. We then show that double-pulse stimuli increase a CA1 pyramidal neuron’s tolerance for input asynchrony by at last an order of magnitude. Therefore, it is shown using this model, that the time window for nonlinear integration is extended by more than an order of magnitude when inputs are short bursts as opposed to single spikes.
139.  Long time windows from theta modulated inhib. in entorhinal–hippo. loop (Cutsuridis & Poirazi 2015)
"A recent experimental study (Mizuseki et al., 2009) has shown that the temporal delays between population activities in successive entorhinal and hippocampal anatomical stages are longer (about 70–80 ms) than expected from axon conduction velocities and passive synaptic integration of feed-forward excitatory inputs. We investigate via computer simulations the mechanisms that give rise to such long temporal delays in the hippocampus structures. ... The model shows that the experimentally reported long temporal delays in the DG, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal regions are due to theta modulated somatic and axonic inhibition..."
140.  Long-Term Inactivation of Na+ Channels as a Mech of Adaptation in CA1 Pyr Cells (Upchurch et al '22)
"... Ramps were applied to CA1 pyramidal neurons from male rats in vitro (slice electrophysiology) and in silico (multi-compartmental NEURON model). Under control conditions, CA1 neurons fired more action potentials at higher frequencies on the up-ramp versus the down-ramp. This effect was more pronounced for dendritic compared to somatic ramps. We incorporated a four-state Markov scheme for NaV1.6 channels into our model and calibrated the spatial dependence of long-term inactivation according to the literature; this spatial dependence was sufficient to explain the difference in dendritic versus somatic ramps. Long-term inactivation reduced the firing frequency by decreasing open-state occupancy, and reduced spike amplitude during trains by decreasing occupancy in closed states, which comprise the available pool..."
141.  Look-Up Table Synapse (LUTsyn) models for AMPA and NMDA (Pham et al., 2021)
Fast input-output synapse model of glutamatergic receptors AMPA and NMDA that can capture nonlinear interactions via look-up table abstraction. Speeds are comparable to 'linear' exponential synapses. Download LUT files at: https://senselab.med.yale.edu/modeldb/data/267103/LUTs.zip
142.  LTP in cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell synapses (Saftenku 2002)
We simulated synaptic transmission and modified a simple model of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in order to describe long-term plasticity related changes in cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell synapses. In our model, protein autophosphorylation, leading to the maintenance of long-term plasticity, is controlled by Ca2+ entry through the NMDA receptor channels. The observed nonlinearity in the development of long-term changes of EPSP in granule cells is explained by the difference in the rate constants of two independent autocatalytic processes.
143.  Mathematical model for windup (Aguiar et al. 2010)
"Windup is characterized as a frequency-dependent increase in the number of evoked action potentials in dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical stimulation of afferent C-fibers. ... The approach presented here relies on mathematical and computational analysis to study the mechanism(s) underlying windup. From experimentally obtained windup profiles, we extract the time scale of the facilitation mechanisms that may support the characteristics of windup. Guided by these values and using simulations of a biologically realistic compartmental model of a wide dynamic range (WDR) neuron, we are able to assess the contribution of each mechanism for the generation of action potentials windup. ..."
144.  Maximal firing rate in midbrain dopamine neurons (Knowlton et al., accepted)
145.  MEC layer II stellate cell: Synaptic mechanisms of grid cells (Schmidt-Hieber & Hausser 2013)
This study investigates the cellular mechanisms of grid field generation in Medial Entorhinal Cortex (MEC) layer II stellate cells.
146.  Mechanisms underlying subunit independence in pyramidal neuron dendrites (Behabadi and Mel 2014)
"...Using a detailed compartmental model of a layer 5 pyramidal neuron, and an improved method for quantifying subunit independence that incorporates a more accurate model of dendritic integration, we first established that the output of each dendrite can be almost perfectly predicted by the intensity and spatial configuration of its own synaptic inputs, and is nearly invariant to the rate of bAP-mediated 'cross-talk' from other dendrites over a 100-fold range..."
147.  Medial vestibular neuron models (Quadroni and Knopfel 1994)
The structure and the parameters of the model cells were chosen to reproduce the responses of type A and type B MVNns as described in electrophysiological recordings. The emergence of oscillatory firing under these two specific experimental conditions is consistent with electrophysiological recordings not used during construction of the model. We, therefore, suggest that these models have a high predictive value.
148.  MEG of Somatosensory Neocortex (Jones et al. 2007)
"... To make a direct and principled connection between the SI (somatosensory primary neocortex magnetoencephalography) waveform and underlying neural dynamics, we developed a biophysically realistic computational SI model that contained excitatory and inhibitory neurons in supragranular and infragranular layers. ... our model provides a biophysically realistic solution to the MEG signal and can predict the electrophysiological correlates of human perception."
149.  Microcircuits of L5 thick tufted pyramidal cells (Hay & Segev 2015)
"... We simulated detailed conductance-based models of TTCs (Layer 5 thick tufted pyramidal cells) forming recurrent microcircuits that were interconnected as found experimentally; the network was embedded in a realistic background synaptic activity. ... Our findings indicate that dendritic nonlinearities are pivotal in controlling the gain and the computational functions of TTCs microcircuits, which serve as a dominant output source for the neocortex. "
150.  Midbrain dopamine neuron: firing patterns (Canavier 1999)
Sodium dynamics drives the generation of slow oscillations postulated to underly NMDA-evoked bursting activity.
151.  Mirror Neuron (Antunes et al 2017)
Modeling Mirror Neurons Through Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity. This script reproduces Figure 3B.
152.  Model for K-ATP mediated bursting in mSNc DA neurons (Knowlton et al 2018)
"Burst firing in medial substantia nigra dopamine (mSN DA) neurons has been selectively linked to novelty-induced exploration behavior in mice. Burst firing in mSN DA neurons, in contrast to lateral SN DA neurons, requires functional ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATP) both in vitro and in vivo. However, the precise role of K-ATP channels in promoting burst firing is un-known. We show experimentally that L-type calcium channel activity in mSN DA neurons en-hances open probability of K-ATP channels. We then generated a mathematical model to study the role of Ca2+ dynamics driving K-ATP channel function in mSN DA neurons during bursting. ..."
153.  Model of the cerebellar granular network (Sudhakar et al 2017)
"The granular layer, which mainly consists of granule and Golgi cells, is the first stage of the cerebellar cortex and processes spatiotemporal information transmitted by mossy fiber inputs with a wide variety of firing patterns. To study its dynamics at multiple time scales in response to inputs approximating real spatiotemporal patterns, we constructed a large-scale 3D network model of the granular layer. ..."
154.  Model of the Xenopus tadpole swimming spinal network (Roberts et al. 2014)
This is a NEURON-python and MATLAB simulation code for generating anatomical or probabilistic connectivity and simulating the neuronal dynamics of the neuronal network controlling swimming in Xenopus tadpoles. For more details about this model, see Ferrario et al, 2018, eLife and Roberts et al, 2014, J of Neurosci
155.  Modelling platform of the cochlear nucleus and other auditory circuits (Manis & Compagnola 2018)
"Models of the auditory brainstem have been an invaluable tool for testing hypotheses about auditory information processing and for highlighting the most important gaps in the experimental literature. Due to the complexity of the auditory brainstem, and indeed most brain circuits, the dynamic behavior of the system may be difficult to predict without a detailed, biologically realistic computational model. Despite the sensitivity of models to their exact construction and parameters, most prior models of the cochlear nucleus have incorporated only a small subset of the known biological properties. This confounds the interpretation of modelling results and also limits the potential future uses of these models, which require a large effort to develop. To address these issues, we have developed a general purpose, bio-physically detailed model of the cochlear nucleus for use both in testing hypotheses about cochlear nucleus function and also as an input to models of downstream auditory nuclei. The model implements conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley representations of cells using a Python-based interface to the NEURON simulator. ..."
156.  Motor cortex microcircuit simulation based on brain activity mapping (Chadderdon et al. 2014)
"... We developed a computational model based primarily on a unified set of brain activity mapping studies of mouse M1. The simulation consisted of 775 spiking neurons of 10 cell types with detailed population-to-population connectivity. Static analysis of connectivity with graph-theoretic tools revealed that the corticostriatal population showed strong centrality, suggesting that would provide a network hub. ... By demonstrating the effectiveness of combined static and dynamic analysis, our results show how static brain maps can be related to the results of brain activity mapping."
157.  Motor system model with reinforcement learning drives virtual arm (Dura-Bernal et al 2017)
"We implemented a model of the motor system with the following components: dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), primary motor cortex (M1), spinal cord and musculoskeletal arm (Figure 1). PMd modulated M1 to select the target to reach, M1 excited the descending spinal cord neurons that drove the arm muscles, and received arm proprioceptive feedback (information about the arm position) via the ascending spinal cord neurons. The large-scale model of M1 consisted of 6,208 spiking Izhikevich model neurons [37] of four types: regular-firing and bursting pyramidal neurons, and fast-spiking and low-threshold-spiking interneurons. These were distributed across cortical layers 2/3, 5A, 5B and 6, with cell properties, proportions, locations, connectivity, weights and delays drawn primarily from mammalian experimental data [38], [39], and described in detail in previous work [29]. The network included 486,491 connections, with synapses modeling properties of four different receptors ..."
158.  Multiplication by NMDA receptors in Direction Selective Ganglion cells (Poleg-Polsky & Diamond 2016)
The model demonstrates how signal amplification with NMDARs depends on the synaptic environment. When direction selectivity (DS) detection is mediated by DS inhibition, NMDARs multiply other synaptic conductances. In the case of DS tuned excitation, NMDARs contribute additively.
159.  Multiscale interactions between chemical and electric signaling in LTP (Bhalla 2011)
"Synaptic plasticity leads to long-term changes in excitability, whereas cellular homeostasis maintains excitability. Both these processes involve interactions between molecular events, electrical events, and network activity. Here I explore these intersections with a multilevel model that embeds molecular events following synaptic calcium influx into a multicompartmental electrical model of a CA1 hippocampal neuron. ..."
160.  Multiscale model of excitotoxicity in PD (Muddapu and Chakravarthy 2020)
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNc). Although the exact cause of cell death is not clear, the hypothesis that metabolic deficiency is a key factor has been gaining attention in recent years. In the present study, we investigate this hypothesis using a multi-scale computational model of the subsystem of the basal ganglia comprising Subthalamic Nucleus (STN), Globus Pallidus externa (GPe) and SNc. The proposed model is a multiscale model in that interactions among the three nuclei are simulated using more abstract Izhikevich neuron models, while the molecular pathways involved in cell death of SNc neurons are simulated in terms of detailed chemical kinetics. Simulation results obtained from the proposed model showed that energy deficiencies occurring at cellular and network levels could precipitate the excitotoxic loss of SNc neurons in PD. At the subcellular level, the models show how calcium elevation leads to apoptosis of SNc neurons. The therapeutic effects of several neuroprotective interventions are also simulated in the model. From neuroprotective studies, it was clear that glutamate inhibition and apoptotic signal blocker therapies were able to halt the progression of SNc cell loss when compared to other therapeutic interventions, which only slows down the progression of SNc cell loss.
161.  MyFirstNEURON (Houweling, Sejnowski 1997)
MyFirstNEURON is a NEURON demo by Arthur Houweling and Terry Sejnowski. Perform experiments from the book 'Electrophysiology of the Neuron, A Companion to Shepherd's Neurobiology, An Interactive Tutorial' by John Huguenard & David McCormick, Oxford University Press 1997, or design your own one or two cell simulation.
162.  Network bursts in cultured NN result from different adaptive mechanisms (Masquelier & Deco 2013)
It is now well established that cultured neuron networks are spontaneously active, and tend to synchronize. Synchronous events typically involve the whole network, and have thus been termed “network spikes” (NS). Using experimental recordings and numerical simulations, we show here that the inter-NS interval statistics are complex, and allow inferring the neural mechanisms at work, in particular the adaptive ones, and estimating a number of parameters to which we cannot access experimentally.
163.  Network model of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex (Maex, De Schutter 1998)
We computed the steady-state activity of a large-scale model of the granular layer of the rat cerebellum. Within a few tens of milliseconds after the start of random mossy fiber input, the populations of Golgi and granule cells became entrained in a single synchronous oscillation, the basic frequency of which ranged from 10 to 40 Hz depending on the average rate of firing in the mossy fiber population. ... The synchronous, rhythmic firing pattern was robust over a broad range of biologically realistic parameter values and to parameter randomization. Three conditions, however, made the oscillations more transient and could desynchronize the entire network in the end: a very low mossy fiber activity, a very dominant excitation of Golgi cells through mossy fiber synapses (rather than through parallel fiber synapses), and a tonic activation of granule cell GABAA receptors (with an almost complete absence of synaptically induced inhibitory postsynaptic currents). The model predicts that, under conditions of strong mossy fiber input to the cerebellum, Golgi cells do not only control the strength of parallel fiber activity but also the timing of the individual spikes. Provided that their parallel fiber synapses constitute an important source of excitation, Golgi cells fire rhythmically and synchronized with granule cells over large distances along the parallel fiber axis. See paper for more and details.
164.  Network recruitment to coherent oscillations in a hippocampal model (Stacey et al. 2011)
"... Here we demonstrate, via a detailed computational model, a mechanism whereby physiological noise and coupling initiate oscillations and then recruit neighboring tissue, in a manner well described by a combination of Stochastic Resonance and Coherence Resonance. We develop a novel statistical method to quantify recruitment using several measures of network synchrony. This measurement demonstrates that oscillations spread via preexisting network connections such as interneuronal connections, recurrent synapses, and gap junctions, provided that neighboring cells also receive sufficient inputs in the form of random synaptic noise. ..."
165.  Neural mass model of spindle generation in the isolated thalamus (Schellenberger Costa et al. 2016)
The model generates different oscillatory patterns in the thalamus, including delta and spindle band oscillations.
166.  Neural mass model of the sleeping thalamocortical system (Schellenberger Costa et al 2016)
This paper generates typical human EEG data of sleep stages N2/N3 as well as wakefulness and REM sleep.
167.  Nigral dopaminergic neurons: effects of ethanol on Ih (Migliore et al. 2008)
We use a realistic computational model of dopaminergic neurons in vivo to suggest that ethanol, through its effects on Ih, modifies the temporal structure of the spiking activity. The model predicts that the dopamine level may increase much more during bursting than pacemaking activity, especially in those brain regions with a slow dopamine clearance rate. The results suggest that a selective pharmacological remedy could thus be devised against the rewarding effects of ethanol that are postulated to mediate alcohol abuse and addiction, targeting the specific HCN genes expressed in dopaminergic neurons.
168.  NMDA receptor saturation (Chen et al 2001)
Experiments and modeling reported in the paper Chen N, Ren J, Raymond LA, and Murphy T (2001) support the hypothesis that glutamate has a relatively lower potency at NMDARs than previously thought from agonist application under equilibrium conditions. Further information and reprint requests are available from Dr T.H. Murphy thmurphy at interchange.ubc.ca
169.  NMDA receptors enhance the fidelity of synaptic integration (Li and Gulledge 2021)
Excitatory synaptic transmission in many neurons is mediated by two co-expressed ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes, AMPA and NMDA receptors, that differ in their kinetics, ion-selectivity, and voltage-sensitivity. AMPA receptors have fast kinetics and are voltage-insensitive, while NMDA receptors have slower kinetics and increased conductance at depolarized membrane potentials. Here we report that the voltage-dependency and kinetics of NMDA receptors act synergistically to stabilize synaptic integration of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) across spatial and voltage domains. Simulations of synaptic integration in simplified and morphologically realistic dendritic trees revealed that the combined presence of AMPA and NMDA conductances reduces the variability of somatic responses to spatiotemporal patterns of excitatory synaptic input presented at different initial membrane potentials and/or in different dendritic domains. This moderating effect of the NMDA conductance on synaptic integration was robust across a wide range of AMPA-to-NMDA ratios, and results from synergistic interaction of NMDA kinetics (which reduces variability across membrane potential) and voltage-dependence (which favors stabilization across dendritic location). When combined with AMPA conductance, the NMDA conductance balances voltage- and impedance-dependent changes in synaptic driving force, and distance-dependent attenuation of synaptic potentials arriving at the axon, to increase the fidelity of synaptic integration and EPSP-spike coupling across neuron state (i.e., initial membrane potential) and dendritic location of synaptic input. Thus, synaptic NMDA receptors convey advantages for synaptic integration that are independent of, but fully compatible with, their importance for coincidence detection and synaptic plasticity.
170.  NMDA spikes in basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons (Polsky et al. 2009)
"... In apical dendrites of neocortical pyramidal neurons, calcium spikes are known to contribute to burst generation, but a comparable understanding of basal dendritic mechanisms is lacking. Here we show that NMDA spikes in basal dendrites mediate both detection and generation of bursts through a postsynaptic mechanism. High-frequency inputs to basal dendrites markedly facilitated NMDA spike initiation compared with low-frequency activation or single inputs. ..."
171.  NMDAR & GABAB/KIR Give Bistable Dendrites: Working Memory & Sequence Readout (Sanders et al., 2013)
" ...Here, we show that the voltage dependence of the inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) conductance activated by GABA(B) receptors adds substantial robustness to network simulations of bistability and the persistent firing that it underlies. The hyperpolarized state is robust because, at hyperpolarized potentials, the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is high and the NMDA conductance is low; the depolarized state is robust because, at depolarized potentials, the NMDA conductance is high and the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is low. Our results suggest that this complementary voltage dependence of GABA(B)/KIR and NMDA conductances makes them a "perfect couple" for producing voltage bistability."
172.  Nonlinear dendritic processing in barrel cortex spiny stellate neurons (Lavzin et al. 2012)
This is a multi-compartmental simulation of a spiny stellate neuron which is stimulated by a thalamocortical (TC) and cortico-cortical (CC) inputs. No other cells are explicitly modeled; the presynaptic network activation is represented by the number of active synapses. Preferred and non –preferred thalamic directions thus correspond to larder/smaller number of TC synapses. This simulation revealed that randomly activated synapses can cooperatively trigger global NMDA spikes, which involve participation of most of the dendritic tree. Surprisingly, we found that although the voltage profile of the cell was uniform, the calcium influx was restricted to ‘hot spots’ which correspond to synaptic clusters or large conductance synapses
173.  Normal ripples, abnormal ripples, and fast ripples in a hippocampal model (Fink et al. 2015)
"...We use a computational model of hippocampus to investigate possible network mechanisms underpinning normal ripples, pathological ripples, and fast ripples. Our results unify several prior findings regarding HFO mechanisms, and also make several new predictions regarding abnormal HFOs. We show that HFOs are generic, emergent phenomena whose characteristics reflect a wide range of connectivity and network input. Although produced by different mechanisms, both normal and abnormal HFOs generate similar ripple frequencies, underscoring that peak frequency is unable to distinguish the two. Abnormal ripples are generic phenomena that arise when input to pyramidal cells overcomes network inhibition, resulting in high-frequency, uncoordinated firing. In addition, fast ripples transiently and sporadically arise from the precise conditions that produce abnormal ripples. Lastly, we show that such abnormal conditions do not require any specific network structure to produce coherent HFOs, as even completely asynchronous activity is capable of producing abnormal ripples and fast ripples in this manner. These results provide a generic, network-based explanation for the link between pathological ripples and fast ripples, and a unifying description for the entire spectrum from normal ripples to pathological fast ripples."
174.  Olfactory bulb granule cell: effects of odor deprivation (Saghatelyan et al 2005)
The model supports the experimental findings on the effects of postnatal odor deprivation, and shows that a -10mV shift in the Na activation or a reduction in the dendritic length of newborn GC could independently explain the observed increase in excitability.
175.  Olfactory bulb microcircuits model with dual-layer inhibition (Gilra & Bhalla 2015)
A detailed network model of the dual-layer dendro-dendritic inhibitory microcircuits in the rat olfactory bulb comprising compartmental mitral, granule and PG cells developed by Aditya Gilra, Upinder S. Bhalla (2015). All cell morphologies and network connections are in NeuroML v1.8.0. PG and granule cell channels and synapses are also in NeuroML v1.8.0. Mitral cell channels and synapses are in native python.
176.  Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell column formation (Migliore et al. 2007)
In the olfactory bulb, the processing units for odor discrimination are believed to involve dendrodendritic synaptic interactions between mitral and granule cells. There is increasing anatomical evidence that these cells are organized in columns, and that the columns processing a given odor are arranged in widely distributed arrays. Experimental evidence is lacking on the underlying learning mechanisms for how these columns and arrays are formed. We have used a simplified realistic circuit model to test the hypothesis that distributed connectivity can self-organize through an activity-dependent dendrodendritic synaptic mechanism. The results point to action potentials propagating in the mitral cell lateral dendrites as playing a critical role in this mechanism, and suggest a novel and robust learning mechanism for the development of distributed processing units in a cortical structure.
177.  Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell: dendrodendritic microcircuits (Migliore and Shepherd 2008)
This model shows how backpropagating action potentials in the long lateral dendrites of mitral cells, together with granule cell actions on mitral cells within narrow columns forming glomerular units, can provide a mechanism to activate strong local inhibition between arbitrarily distant mitral cells. The simulations predict a new role for the dendrodendritic synapses in the multicolumnar organization of the granule cells.
178.  Olfactory Bulb mitral-granule network generates beta oscillations (Osinski & Kay 2016)
This model of the dendrodendritic mitral-granule synaptic network generates gamma and beta oscillations as a function of the granule cell excitability, which is represented by the granule cell resting membrane potential.
179.  Olfactory Bulb Network (Davison et al 2003)
A biologically-detailed model of the mammalian olfactory bulb, incorporating the mitral and granule cells and the dendrodendritic synapses between them. The results of simulation experiments with electrical stimulation agree closely in most details with published experimental data. The model predicts that the time course of dendrodendritic inhibition is dependent on the network connectivity as well as on the intrinsic parameters of the synapses. In response to simulated odor stimulation, strongly activated mitral cells tend to suppress neighboring cells, the mitral cells readily synchronize their firing, and increasing the stimulus intensity increases the degree of synchronization. For more details, see the reference below.
180.  Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule cell circuits (Migliore & McTavish 2013)
Model files for the entry "Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule Cell Circuits" of the Springer Encyclopedia of Computational Neuroscience by Michele Migliore and Tom Mctavish. The simulations illustrate two typical Mitral-Granule cell circuits in the olfactory bulb of vertebrates: distance-independent lateral inhibition and gating effects.
181.  Orientation preference in L23 V1 pyramidal neurons (Park et al 2019)
"Pyramidal neurons integrate synaptic inputs from basal and apical dendrites to generate stimulus-specific responses. It has been proposed that feed-forward inputs to basal dendrites drive a neuron’s stimulus preference, while feedback inputs to apical dendrites sharpen selectivity. However, how a neuron’s dendritic domains relate to its functional selectivity has not been demonstrated experimentally. We performed 2-photon dendritic micro-dissection on layer-2/3 pyramidal neurons in mouse primary visual cortex. We found that removing the apical dendritic tuft did not alter orientation-tuning. Furthermore, orientation-tuning curves were remarkably robust to the removal of basal dendrites: ablation of 2 basal dendrites was needed to cause a small shift in orientation preference, without significantly altering tuning width. Computational modeling corroborated our results and put limits on how orientation preferences among basal dendrites differ in order to reproduce the post-ablation data. In conclusion, neuronal orientation-tuning appears remarkably robust to loss of dendritic input."
182.  Parallel odor processing by mitral and middle tufted cells in the OB (Cavarretta et al 2016, 2018)
"[...] experimental findings suggest that MC and mTC may encode parallel and complementary odor representations. We have analyzed the functional roles of these pathways by using a morphologically and physiologically realistic three-dimensional model to explore the MC and mTC microcircuits in the glomerular layer and deeper plexiform layers. [...]"
183.  Parametric computation and persistent gamma in a cortical model (Chambers et al. 2012)
Using the Traub et al (2005) model of the cortex we determined how 33 synaptic strength parameters control gamma oscillations. We used fractional factorial design to reduce the number of runs required to 4096. We found an expected multiplicative interaction between parameters.
184.  Persistent synchronized bursting activity in cortical tissues (Golomb et al 2005)
The program simulates a one-dimensional model of a cortical tissue with excitatory and inhibitory populations.
185.  Prosthetic electrostimulation for information flow repair in a neocortical simulation (Kerr 2012)
This model is an extension of a model ( http://modeldb.yale.edu/138379 ) recently published in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience. This model consists of 4700 event-driven, rule-based neurons, wired according to anatomical data, and driven by both white-noise synaptic inputs and a sensory signal recorded from a rat thalamus. Its purpose is to explore the effects of cortical damage, along with the repair of this damage via a neuroprosthesis.
186.  Pyramidal neuron conductances state and STDP (Delgado et al. 2010)
Neocortical neurons in vivo process each of their individual inputs in the context of ongoing synaptic background activity, produced by the thousands of presynaptic partners a typical neuron has. That background activity affects multiple aspects of neuronal and network function. However, its effect on the induction of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is not clear. Using the present biophysically-detailed computational model, it is not only able to replicate the conductance-dependent shunting of dendritic potentials (Delgado et al,2010), but show that synaptic background can truncate calcium dynamics within dendritic spines, in a way that affects potentiation more strongly than depression. This program uses a simplified layer 2/3 pyramidal neuron constructed in NEURON. It was similar to the model of Traub et al., J Neurophysiol. (2003), and consisted of a soma, an apical shaft, distal dendrites, five basal dendrites, an axon, and a single spine. The spine’s location was variable along the apical shaft (initial 50 &#956;m) and apical. The axon contained an axon hillock region, an initial segment, segments with myelin, and nodes of Ranvier, in order to have realistic action potential generation. For more information about the model see supplemental material, Delgado et al 2010.
187.  Pyramidal neuron, fast, regular, and irregular spiking interneurons (Konstantoudaki et al 2014)
This is a model network of prefrontal cortical microcircuit based primarily on rodent data. It includes 16 pyramidal model neurons, 2 fast spiking interneuron models, 1 regular spiking interneuron model and 1 irregular spiking interneuron model. The goal of the paper was to use this model network to determine the role of specific interneuron subtypes in persistent activity
188.  Rat LGN Thalamocortical Neuron (Connelly et al 2015, 2016)
" ... Here, combining data from fluorescence-targeted dendritic recordings and Ca2+ imaging from low-threshold spiking cells in rat brain slices with computational modeling, the cellular mechanism responsible for LTS (Low Threshold Spike) generation is established. ..." " ... Using dendritic recording, 2-photon glutamate uncaging, and computational modeling, we investigated how rat dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus thalamocortical neurons integrate excitatory corticothalamic feedback. ..."
189.  Reconstructing cerebellar granule layer evoked LFP using convolution (ReConv) (Diwakar et al. 2011)
The model allows reconstruction of evoked local field potentials as seen in the cerebellar granular layer. The approach uses a detailed model of cerebellar granule neuron to generate data traces and then uses a "ReConv" or jittered repetitive convolution technique to reproduce post-synaptic local field potentials in the granular layer. The algorithm was used to generate both in vitro and in vivo evoked LFP and reflected the changes seen during LTP and LTD, when such changes were induced in the underlying neurons by modulating release probability of synapses and sodium channel regulated intrinsic excitability of the cells.
190.  Regulation of the firing pattern in dopamine neurons (Komendantov et al 2004)
Midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons in vivo exhibit two major firing patterns: single-spike firing and burst firing. The firing pattern expressed is dependent on both the intrinsic properties of the neurons and their excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Experimental data suggest that the activation of NMDA and GABAA receptors is crucial contributor to the initiation and suppression of burst firing, respectively, and that blocking calcium-activated potassium channels can facilitate burst firing. This multi-compartmental model of a DA neuron with a branching structure was developed and calibrated based on in vitro experimental data to explore the effects of different levels of activation of NMDA and GABAA receptors as well as the modulation of the SK current on the firing activity.
191.  Reinforcement learning of targeted movement (Chadderdon et al. 2012)
"Sensorimotor control has traditionally been considered from a control theory perspective, without relation to neurobiology. In contrast, here we utilized a spiking-neuron model of motor cortex and trained it to perform a simple movement task, which consisted of rotating a single-joint “forearm” to a target. Learning was based on a reinforcement mechanism analogous to that of the dopamine system. This provided a global reward or punishment signal in response to decreasing or increasing distance from hand to target, respectively. Output was partially driven by Poisson motor babbling, creating stochastic movements that could then be shaped by learning. The virtual forearm consisted of a single segment rotated around an elbow joint, controlled by flexor and extensor muscles. ..."
192.  Ribbon Synapse (Sikora et al 2005)
A model of the ribbon synapse was developed to replicate both pre- and postsynaptic functions of this glutamatergic juncture. The presynaptic portion of the model is rich in anatomical and physiological detail and includes multiple release sites for each ribbon based on anatomical studies of presynaptic terminals, presynaptic voltage at the terminal, the activation of voltage-gated calcium channels and a calcium-dependent release mechanism whose rate varies as a function of the calcium concentration that is monitored at two different sites which control both an ultrafast, docked pool of vesicles and a release ready pool of tethered vesicles. See paper for more and details.
193.  Robust transmission in the inhibitory Purkinje Cell to Cerebellar Nuclei pathway (Abbasi et al 2017)
194.  Roles of essential kinases in induction of late hippocampal LTP (Smolen et al., 2006)
"… Convergence of multiple kinase activities to induce L-LTP helps to generate a threshold whereby the amount of L-LTP varies steeply with the number of brief (tetanic) electrical stimuli. The model simulates tetanic, -burst, pairing-induced, and chemical L-LTP, as well as L-LTP due to synaptic tagging. The model also simulates inhibition of L-LTP by inhibition of MAPK, CAMKII, PKA, or CAMKIV. The model predicts results of experiments to delineate mechanisms underlying L-LTP induction and expression. …"
195.  SCZ-associated variant effects on L5 pyr cell NN activity and delta osc. (Maki-Marttunen et al 2018)
" … Here, using computational modeling, we show that a common biomarker of schizophrenia, namely, an increase in delta-oscillation power, may be a direct consequence of altered expression or kinetics of voltage-gated ion channels or calcium transporters. Our model of a circuit of layer V pyramidal cells highlights multiple types of schizophrenia-related variants that contribute to altered dynamics in the delta frequency band. Moreover, our model predicts that the same membrane mechanisms that increase the layer V pyramidal cell network gain and response to delta-frequency oscillations may also cause a decit in a single-cell correlate of the prepulse inhibition, which is a behavioral biomarker highly associated with schizophrenia."
196.  Self-influencing synaptic plasticity (Tamosiunaite et al. 2007)
"... Similar to a previous study (Saudargiene et al., 2004) we employ a differential Hebbian learning rule to emulate spike-timing dependent plasticity and investigate how the interaction of dendritic and back-propagating spikes, as the post-synaptic signals, could influence plasticity. ..."
197.  Sensorimotor cortex reinforcement learning of 2-joint virtual arm reaching (Neymotin et al. 2013)
"... We developed a model of sensory and motor neocortex consisting of 704 spiking model-neurons. Sensory and motor populations included excitatory cells and two types of interneurons. Neurons were interconnected with AMPA/NMDA, and GABAA synapses. We trained our model using spike-timing-dependent reinforcement learning to control a 2-joint virtual arm to reach to a fixed target. ... "
198.  Sensory-evoked responses of L5 pyramidal tract neurons (Egger et al 2020)
This is the L5 pyramidal tract neuron (L5PT) model from Egger, Narayanan et al., Neuron 2020. It allows investigating how synaptic inputs evoked by different sensory stimuli are integrated by the complex intrinsic properties of L5PTs. The model is constrained by anatomical measurements of the subcellular synaptic input patterns to L5PT neurons, in vivo measurements of sensory-evoked responses of different populations of neurons providing these synaptic inputs, and in vitro measurements constraining the biophysical properties of the soma, dendrites and axon (note: the biophysical model is based on the work by Hay et al., Plos Comp Biol 2011). The model files provided here allow performing simulations and analyses presented in Figures 3, 4 and 5.
199.  Shaping NMDA spikes by timed synaptic inhibition on L5PC (Doron et al. 2017)
This work (published in "Timed synaptic inhibition shapes NMDA spikes, influencing local dendritic processing and global I/O properties of cortical neurons", Doron et al, Cell Reports, 2017), examines the effect of timed inhibition over dendritic NMDA spikes on L5PC (Based on Hay et al., 2011) and CA1 cell (Based on Grunditz et al. 2008 and Golding et al. 2001).
200.  Short Term Depression, Presynaptic Inhib., Neuron Diversity Roles in Antennal Lobe (Wei & Lo 2020)
201.  Short term plasticity at the cerebellar granule cell (Nieus et al. 2006)
The model reproduces short term plasticity of the mossy fibre to granule cell synapse. To reproduce synaptic currents recorded in experiments, a model of presynaptic release was used to determine the concentration of glutamate in the synaptic cleft that ultimately determined a synaptic response. The parameters of facilitation and depression were determined deconvolving AMPA EPSCs.
202.  Single compartment Dorsal Lateral Medium Spiny Neuron w/ NMDA and AMPA (Biddell and Johnson 2013)
A biophysical single compartment model of the dorsal lateral striatum medium spiny neuron is presented here. The model is an implementation then adaptation of a previously described model (Mahon et al. 2002). The model has been adapted to include NMDA and AMPA receptor models that have been fit to dorsal lateral striatal neurons. The receptor models allow for excitation by other neuron models.
203.  Single compartment: nonlinear a5-GABAAR controls synaptic NMDAR activation (Schulz et al 2018)
This study shows that IPSCs mediated by a5-subunit containing GABAA receptors are strongly outward-rectifying generating 4-fold larger conductances above -50?mV than at rest. This model shows that synaptic activation of these receptors can very effectively control voltage-dependent NMDA-receptor activation. The files contain the NEURON code for Fig.6 and Fig.7. The model is a single dendritic compartment with one glutamatergic and GABAergic synapse. Physiological properties of GABA synapses were modeled as determined by optogenetic activation of inputs during voltage-clamp recordings in Schulz et al. 2018.
204.  Single-cell comprehensive biophysical model of SN pars compacta (Muddapu & Chakravarthy 2021)
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is caused by the loss of dopaminergic cells in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), the decisive cause of this inexorable cell loss is not clearly elucidated. We hypothesize that “Energy deficiency at a sub-cellular/cellular/systems-level can be a common underlying cause for SNc cell loss in PD.” Here, we propose a comprehensive computational model of SNc cell which helps us to understand the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration at subcellular-level in PD. We were able to show see how deficits in supply of energy substrates (glucose and oxygen) lead to a deficit in ATP, and furthermore, deficits in ATP are the common factor underlying the pathological molecular-level changes including alpha-synuclein aggregation, ROS formation, calcium elevation, and dopamine dysfunction. The model also suggests that hypoglycemia plays a more crucial role in leading to ATP deficits than hypoxia. We believe that the proposed model provides an integrated modelling framework to understand the neurodegenerative processes underlying PD.
205.  Sleep-wake transitions in corticothalamic system (Bazhenov et al 2002)
The authors investigate the transition between sleep and awake states with intracellular recordings in cats and computational models. The model describes many essential features of slow wave sleep and activated states as well as the transition between them.
206.  Spatial coupling tunes NMDA receptor responses via Ca2+ diffusion (Iacobucci and Popescu 2019)
This code implements a coupled markov model for analysis of positive or negative ion channel coupling from measured unitary currents in patch clamp recordings see our paper: Spatial Coupling Tunes NMDA Receptor Responses via Ca2+ Diffusion Gary J. Iacobucci and Gabriela K. Popescu Journal of Neuroscience 6 November 2019, 39 (45) 8831-8844; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0901-19.2019
207.  Spatial summation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs in pyramidal neurons (Hao et al. 2010)
"... Based on realistic modeling and experiments in rat hippocampal slices, we derived a simple arithmetic rule for spatial summation of concurrent excitatory glutamatergic inputs (E) and inhibitory GABAergic inputs (I). The somatic response can be well approximated as the sum of the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), the inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP), and a nonlinear term proportional to their product (k*EPSP*IPSP), where the coefficient k reflects the strength of shunting effect. ..."
208.  Specific inhibition of dendritic plateau potential in striatal projection neurons (Du et al 2017)
We explored dendritic plateau potentials in a biophysically detailed SPN model. We coupled the dendritic plateaus to different types of inhibitions (dendritic fast and slow inhibitions, perisomatic inhibition from FS interneurons , etc.) We found the inhibition provides precise control over the plateau potential, and thus the spiking output of SPNs.
209.  Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
210.  Spine fusion and branching affects synaptic response (Rusakov et al 1996, 1997)
This compartmental model of a hippocampal granule cell has spinous synapses placed on the second-order dendrites. Changes in shape and connectivity of the spines usually does not effect the synaptic response of the cell unless active conductances are incorporated into the spine membrane (e.g. voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels). With active conductances, spines can generate spike-like events. We showed that changes like fusion and branching, or in fact any increase in the equivalent spine neck resistance, could trigger a dramatic increase in the spine's influence on the dendritic shaft potential.
211.  Spine neck plasticity controls postsynaptic calcium signals (Grunditz et al. 2008)
This model was set up to dissect the relative contribution of different channels to the spine calcium transients measured at single spines.
212.  STDP and BDNF in CA1 spines (Solinas et al. 2019)
Storing memory traces in the brain is essential for learning and memory formation. Memory traces are created by joint electrical activity in neurons that are interconnected by synapses and allow transferring electrical activity from a sending (presynaptic) to a receiving (postsynaptic) neuron. During learning, neurons that are co-active can tune synapses to become more effective. This process is called synaptic plasticity or long-term potentiation (LTP). Timing-dependent LTP (t-LTP) is a physiologically relevant type of synaptic plasticity that results from repeated sequential firing of action potentials (APs) in pre- and postsynaptic neurons. T-LTP is observed during learning in vivo and is a cellular correlate of memory formation. T-LTP can be elicited by different rhythms of synaptic activity that recruit distinct synaptic growth processes underlying t-LTP. The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is released at synapses and mediates synaptic growth in response to specific rhythms of t-LTP stimulation, while other rhythms mediate BDNF-independent t-LTP. Here, we developed a realistic computational model that accounts for our previously published experimental results of BDNF-independent 1:1 t-LTP (pairing of 1 presynaptic with 1 postsynaptic AP) and BDNF-dependent 1:4 t-LTP (pairing of 1 presynaptic with 4 postsynaptic APs). The model explains the magnitude and time course of both t-LTP forms and allows predicting t-LTP properties that result from altered BDNF turnover. Since BDNF levels are decreased in demented patients, understanding the function of BDNF in memory processes is of utmost importance to counteract Alzheimer’s disease.
213.  STDP and NMDAR Subunits (Gerkin et al. 2007)
The paper argues for competing roles of NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs in spike-timing-dependent plasticity. This simple dynamical model recapitulates the results of STDP experiments involving selective blockers of NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs, for which the stimuli are pre- and postsynaptic spikes in varying combinations. Experiments were done using paired recordings from glutamatergic neurons in rat hippocampal cultures. This model focuses on the dynamics of the putative potentiation and depression modules themselves, and their interaction For detailed dynamics involving NMDARs and Ca2+ transients, see Rubin et al., J. Neurophys., 2005.
214.  STDP depends on dendritic synapse location (Letzkus et al. 2006)
This model was published in Letzkus, Kampa & Stuart (2006) J Neurosci 26(41):10420-9. The simulation creates several plots showing voltage and NMDA current and conductance changes at different apical dendritic locations in layer 5 pyramidal neurons during STDP induction protocols. Created by B. Kampa (2006).
215.  Striatal D1R medium spiny neuron, including a subcellular DA cascade (Lindroos et al 2018)
We are investigating how dopaminergic modulation of single channels can be combined to make the D1R possitive MSN more excitable. We also connect multiple channels to substrates of a dopamine induced subcellular cascade to highlight that the classical pathway is too slow to explain DA induced kinetics in the subsecond range (Howe and Dombeck, 2016. doi: 10.1038/nature18942)
216.  Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, dopamine-modulated cell assemblies (Humphries et al. 2009)
To begin identifying potential dynamically-defined computational elements within the striatum, we constructed a new three-dimensional model of the striatal microcircuit's connectivity, and instantiated this with our dopamine-modulated neuron models of the MSNs and FSIs. A new model of gap junctions between the FSIs was introduced and tuned to experimental data. We introduced a novel multiple spike-train analysis method, and apply this to the outputs of the model to find groups of synchronised neurons at multiple time-scales. We found that, with realistic in vivo background input, small assemblies of synchronised MSNs spontaneously appeared, consistent with experimental observations, and that the number of assemblies and the time-scale of synchronisation was strongly dependent on the simulated concentration of dopamine. We also showed that feed-forward inhibition from the FSIs counter-intuitively increases the firing rate of the MSNs.
217.  Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, spatial scales of dynamics (Humphries et al, 2010)
The main thrust of this paper was the development of the 3D anatomical network of the striatum's GABAergic microcircuit. We grew dendrite and axon models for the MSNs and FSIs and extracted probabilities for the presence of these neurites as a function of distance from the soma. From these, we found the probabilities of intersection between the neurites of two neurons given their inter-somatic distance, and used these to construct three-dimensional striatal networks. These networks were examined for their predictions for the distributions of the numbers and distances of connections for all the connections in the microcircuit. We then combined the neuron models from a previous model (Humphries et al, 2009; ModelDB ID: 128874) with the new anatomical model. We used this new complete striatal model to examine the impact of the anatomical network on the firing properties of the MSN and FSI populations, and to study the influence of all the inputs to one MSN within the network.
218.  Striatal Spiny Projection Neuron (SPN) plasticity rule (Jedrzejewska-Szmek et al 2016)
219.  Striatal Spiny Projection Neuron, inhibition enhances spatial specificity (Dorman et al 2018)
We use a computational model of a striatal spiny projection neuron to investigate dendritic spine calcium dynamics in response to spatiotemporal patterns of synaptic inputs. We show that spine calcium elevation is stimulus-specific, with supralinear calcium elevation in cooperatively stimulated spines. Intermediate calcium elevation occurs in neighboring non-stimulated dendritic spines, predicting heterosynaptic effects. Inhibitory synaptic inputs enhance the difference between peak calcium in stimulated spines, and peak calcium in non-stimulated spines, thereby enhancing stimulus specificity.
220.  Striatum D1 Striosome and Matrix Upstates (Prager et al., 2020)
"...We show that dopamine oppositely shapes responses to convergent excitatory inputs in mouse striosome and matrix striatal spiny projection neurons (SPNs). Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptors promoted the generation of long-lasting synaptically evoked 'up-states' in matrix SPNs but opposed it in striosomes, which were more excitable under basal conditions. Differences in dopaminergic modulation were mediated, in part, by dendritic voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs): pharmacological manipulation of L-type VGCCs reversed compartment-specific responses to D1 receptor activation..."
221.  Structure-dynamics relationships in bursting neuronal networks revealed (Mäki-Marttunen et al. 2013)
This entry includes tools for generating and analyzing network structure, and for running the neuronal network simulations on them.
222.  Subiculum network model with dynamic chloride/potassium homeostasis (Buchin et al 2016)
This is the code implementing the single neuron and spiking neural network dynamics. The network has the dynamic ion concentrations of extracellular potassium and intracellular chloride. The code contains multiple parameter variations to study various mechanisms of the neural excitability in the context of chloride homeostasis.
223.  Syn Plasticity Regulation + Information Processing in Neuron-Astrocyte Networks (Vuillaume et al 21)
"... we consider a model of astrocyte-regulated synapses to investigate this hypothesis at the level of layered networks of interacting neurons and astrocytes. Our simulations hint that gliotransmission sustains the transfer function across layers, although it decorrelates the neuronal activity from the signal pattern..."
224.  Synaptic information transfer in computer models of neocortical columns (Neymotin et al. 2010)
"... We sought to measure how the activity of the network alters information flow from inputs to output patterns. Information handling by the network reflected the degree of internal connectivity. ... With greater connectivity strength, the recurrent network translated activity and information due to contribution of activity from intrinsic network dynamics. ... At still higher internal synaptic strength, the network corrupted the external information, producing a state where little external information came through. The association of increased information retrieved from the network with increased gamma power supports the notion of gamma oscillations playing a role in information processing."
225.  Synaptic integration in a model of granule cells (Gabbiani et al 1994)
We have developed a compartmental model of a turtle cerebellar granule cell consisting of 13 compartments that represent the soma and 4 dendrites. We used this model to investigate the synaptic integration of mossy fiber inputs in granule cells. See reference or abstract at PubMed link below for more information.
226.  Synaptic integration in tuft dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (Larkum et al. 2009)
Simulations used in the paper. Voltage responses to current injections in different tuft locations; NMDA and calcium spike generation. Summation of multiple input distribution.
227.  Synaptic scaling balances learning in a spiking model of neocortex (Rowan & Neymotin 2013)
Learning in the brain requires complementary mechanisms: potentiation and activity-dependent homeostatic scaling. We introduce synaptic scaling to a biologically-realistic spiking model of neocortex which can learn changes in oscillatory rhythms using STDP, and show that scaling is necessary to balance both positive and negative changes in input from potentiation and atrophy. We discuss some of the issues that arise when considering synaptic scaling in such a model, and show that scaling regulates activity whilst allowing learning to remain unaltered.
228.  Synaptic vesicle fusion model (Church et al 2021)
These parameter files define Cell simulations of glutamate release and receptor binding at synapses. Four basic models are included that vary, the pore diameter of a fusing vesicle from full fusion (FullFusion) to a variable sized pore from a small as 0.4nm (DelayFusion), that vary the umber of fusing vesicles (Multivesicular) or that vary the position of the fusing vesicle with the post synaptic glutamate receptors (Clustered receptors). Our work demonstrates that experimental effects on release and low affinity antagonism are well-fit by reduced release rates of glutamate from a restricted pore.
229.  Synchronicity of fast-spiking interneurons balances medium-spiny neurons (Damodaran et al. 2014)
This study investigates the role of feedforward and feedback inhibition in maintaining the balance between D1 and D2 MSNs of the striatum. The synchronized firing of FSIs are found to be critical in this mechanism and specifically the gap junction connections between FSIs.
230.  Synchrony by synapse location (McTavish et al. 2012)
This model considers synchrony between mitral cells induced via shared granule cell interneurons while taking into account the spatial constraints of the system. In particular, since inhibitory inputs decay passively along the lateral dendrites, this model demonstrates that an optimal arrangement of the inhibitory synapses will be near the cell bodies of the relevant mitral cells.
231.  Thalamic network model of deep brain stimulation in essential tremor (Birdno et al. 2012)
"... Thus the decreased effectiveness of temporally irregular DBS trains is due to long pauses in the stimulus trains, not the degree of temporal irregularity alone. We also conducted computer simulations of neuronal responses to the experimental stimulus trains using a biophysical model of the thalamic network. Trains that suppressed tremor in volunteers also suppressed fluctuations in thalamic transmembrane potential at the frequency associated with cerebellar burst-driver inputs. Clinical and computational findings indicate that DBS suppresses tremor by masking burst-driver inputs to the thalamus and that pauses in stimulation prevent such masking. Although stimulation of other anatomic targets may provide tremor suppression, we propose that the most relevant neuronal targets for effective tremor suppression are the afferent cerebellar fibers that terminate in the thalamus."
232.  The APP in C-terminal domain alters CA1 neuron firing (Pousinha et al 2019)
"The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is central to AD pathogenesis and we recently showed that its intracellular domain (AICD) could modify synaptic signal integration. We now hypothezise that AICD modifies neuron firing activity, thus contributing to the disruption of memory processes. Using cellular, electrophysiological and behavioural techniques, we showed that pathological AICD levels weakens CA1 neuron firing activity through a gene transcription-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, increased AICD production in hippocampal neurons modifies oscillatory activity, specifically in the gamma frequency range, and disrupts spatial memory task. Collectively, our data suggest that AICD pathological levels, observed in AD mouse models and in human patients, might contribute to progressive neuron homeostatic failure, driving the shift from normal ageing to AD."
233.  The origin of different spike and wave-like events (Hall et al 2017)
Acute In vitro models have revealed a great deal of information about mechanisms underlying many types of epileptiform activity. However, few examples exist that shed light on spike and wave (SpW) patterns of pathological activity. SpW are seen in many epilepsy syndromes, both generalised and focal, and manifest across the entire age spectrum. They are heterogeneous in terms of their severity, symptom burden and apparent anatomical origin (thalamic, neocortical or both), but any relationship between this heterogeneity and underlying pathology remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that physiological delta frequency rhythms act as an effective substrate to permit modelling of SpW of cortical origin and may help to address this issue. ..."
234.  Theta phase precession in a model CA3 place cell (Baker and Olds 2007)
"... The present study concerns a neurobiologically based computational model of the emergence of theta phase precession in which the responses of a single model CA3 pyramidal cell are examined in the context of stimulation by realistic afferent spike trains including those of place cells in entorhinal cortex, dentate gyrus, and other CA3 pyramidal cells. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in the model CA3 pyramidal cell leads to a spatially correlated associational synaptic drive that subsequently creates a spatially asymmetric expansion of the model cell’s place field. ... Through selective manipulations of the model it is possible to decompose theta phase precession in CA3 into the separate contributing factors of inheritance from upstream afferents in the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex, the interaction of synaptically controlled increasing afferent drive with phasic inhibition, and the theta phase difference between dentate gyrus granule cell and CA3 pyramidal cell activity."
235.  Tonic activation of extrasynaptic NMDA-R promotes bistability (Gall & Dupont 2020)
Our theoretical model provides a simple description of neuronal electrical activity that takes into account the tonic activity of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors and a cytosolic calcium compartment. We show that calcium influx mediated by the tonic activity of NMDA-R can be coupled directly to the activation of calcium-activated potassium channels, resulting in an overall inhibitory effect on neuronal excitability. Furthermore, the presence of tonic NMDA-R activity promotes bistability in electrical activity by dramatically increasing the stimulus interval where both a stable steady state and repetitive firing can coexist. These results could provide an intrinsic mechanism for the constitution of memory traces in neuronal circuits.
236.  Turtle visual cortex model (Nenadic et al. 2003, Wang et al. 2005, Wang et al. 2006)
This is a model of the visual cortex of freshwater turtles that is based upon the known anatomy and physiology of individual neurons. The model was published in three papers (Nenadic et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2005; Wang et al., 2006), which should be consulted for full details on its construction. The model has also been used in several papers (Robbins and Senseman, 2004; Du et al., 2005; Du et al., 2006). It is implemented in GENESIS (Bower and Beeman, 1998).
237.  Unbalanced peptidergic inhibition in superficial cortex underlies seizure activity (Hall et al 2015)
" ...Loss of tonic neuromodulatory excitation, mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine or serotonin (5HT3A) receptors, of 5HT3-immunopositive interneurons caused an increase in amplitude and slowing of the delta rhythm until each period became the "wave" component of the spike and wave discharge. As with the normal delta rhythm, the wave of a spike and wave discharge originated in cortical layer 5. In contrast, the "spike" component of the spike and wave discharge originated from a relative failure of fast inhibition in layers 2/3-switching pyramidal cell action potential outputs from single, sparse spiking during delta rhythms to brief, intense burst spiking, phase-locked to the field spike. The mechanisms underlying this loss of superficial layer fast inhibition, and a concomitant increase in slow inhibition, appeared to be precipitated by a loss of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-mediated local circuit inhibition and a subsequent increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated disinhibition. Blockade of NPY Y1 receptors was sufficient to generate spike and wave discharges, whereas blockade of VIP receptors almost completely abolished this form of epileptiform activity. These data suggest that aberrant, activity-dependent neuropeptide corelease can have catastrophic effects on neocortical dynamics."
238.  Visual Cortex Neurons: Dendritic study (Anderson et al 1999)
Neuron mod and hoc files for the paper: Anderson, J.C. Binzegger, T., Kahana, O., Segev, I., and Martin, K.A.C Dendritic asymmetry cannot account for directional responses in visual cortex. Nature Neuroscience 2:820:824, 1999
239.  VTA dopamine neuron (Tarfa, Evans, and Khaliq 2017)
In our model of a midbrain VTA dopamine neuron, we show that the decay kinetics of the A-type potassium current can control the timing of rebound action potentials.

Re-display model names without descriptions