Models that contain the Neuron : Thalamus geniculate nucleus/lateral principal GLU cell

Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1.  A contracting model of the basal ganglia (Girard et al. 2008)
Basal ganglia model : selection processes between channels, dynamics controlled by contraction analysis, rate-coding model of neurons based on locally projected dynamical systems (lPDS).
2.  A Model Circuit of Thalamocortical Convergence (Behuret et al. 2013)
“… Using dynamic-clamp techniques in thalamic slices in vitro, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to implement a realistic hybrid retino-thalamo-cortical pathway mixing biological cells and simulated circuits. … The study of the impact of the simulated cortical input on the global retinocortical signal transfer efficiency revealed a novel control mechanism resulting from the collective resonance of all thalamic relay neurons. We show here that the transfer efficiency of sensory input transmission depends on three key features: i) the number of thalamocortical cells involved in the many-to-one convergence from thalamus to cortex, ii) the statistics of the corticothalamic synaptic bombardment and iii) the level of correlation imposed between converging thalamic relay cells. In particular, our results demonstrate counterintuitively that the retinocortical signal transfer efficiency increases when the level of correlation across thalamic cells decreases. …”
3.  A single column thalamocortical network model (Traub et al 2005)
To better understand population phenomena in thalamocortical neuronal ensembles, we have constructed a preliminary network model with 3,560 multicompartment neurons (containing soma, branching dendrites, and a portion of axon). Types of neurons included superficial pyramids (with regular spiking [RS] and fast rhythmic bursting [FRB] firing behaviors); RS spiny stellates; fast spiking (FS) interneurons, with basket-type and axoaxonic types of connectivity, and located in superficial and deep cortical layers; low threshold spiking (LTS) interneurons, that contacted principal cell dendrites; deep pyramids, that could have RS or intrinsic bursting (IB) firing behaviors, and endowed either with non-tufted apical dendrites or with long tufted apical dendrites; thalamocortical relay (TCR) cells; and nucleus reticularis (nRT) cells. To the extent possible, both electrophysiology and synaptic connectivity were based on published data, although many arbitrary choices were necessary.
4.  A unified thalamic model of multiple distinct oscillations (Li, Henriquez and Fröhlich 2017)
We present a unified model of the thalamus that is capable of independently generating multiple distinct oscillations (delta, spindle, alpha and gamma oscillations) under different levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE) modulation corresponding to different physiological conditions (deep sleep, light sleep, relaxed wakefulness and attention). The model also shows that entrainment of thalamic oscillations is state-dependent.
5.  Activity dependent regulation of pacemaker channels by cAMP (Wang et al 2002)
Demonstration of the physiological consequences of the cyclic allosteric gating scheme for Ih mediated by HCN2 in thalamocortical relay cells.
6.  Alpha rhythm in vitro visual cortex (Traub et al 2020)
The paper describes an experimental model of the alpha rhythm generated by layer 4 pyramidal neurons in a visual cortex slice. The simulation model is derived from that of Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol, developed for thalamocortical oscillations.
7.  Basal ganglia-thalamic network model for deep brain stimulation (So et al. 2012)
This is a model of the basal ganglia-thalamic network, modified from the Rubin and Terman model (High frequency stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus, Rubin and Terman 2004). We subsequently used this model to investigate the effectiveness of STN and GPi DBS as well as lesion when various proportions of local cells and fibers of passage were activated or silenced. The BG network exhibited characteristics consistent with published experimental data, both on the level of single cells and on the network level. Perhaps most notably, and in contrast to the original RT model, the changes in the thalamic error index with changes in the DBS frequency matched well the changes in clinical symptoms with changes in DBS frequency.
8.  Coding of stimulus frequency by latency in thalamic networks (Golomb et al 2005)
The paper presents models of the rat vibrissa processing system including the posterior medial (POm) thalamus, ventroposterior medial (VPm) thalamus, and GABAB- mediated feedback inhibition from the reticular thalamic (Rt) nucleus. A clear match between the experimentally measured spike-rates and the numerically calculated rates for the full model occurs when VPm thalamus receives stronger brainstem input and weaker GABAB-mediated inhibition than POm thalamus.
9.  Collection of simulated data from a thalamocortical network model (Glabska, Chintaluri, Wojcik 2017)
"A major challenge in experimental data analysis is the validation of analytical methods in a fully controlled scenario where the justification of the interpretation can be made directly and not just by plausibility. ... One solution is to use simulations of realistic models to generate ground truth data. In neuroscience, creating such data requires plausible models of neural activity, access to high performance computers, expertise and time to prepare and run the simulations, and to process the output. To facilitate such validation tests of analytical methods we provide rich data sets including intracellular voltage traces, transmembrane currents, morphologies, and spike times. ... The data were generated using the largest publicly available multicompartmental model of thalamocortical network (Traub et al. 2005), with activity evoked by different thalamic stimuli."
10.  Computer model of clonazepam's effect in thalamic slice (Lytton 1997)
Demonstration of the effect of a minor pharmacological synaptic change at the network level. Clonazepam, a benzodiazepine, enhances inhibition but is paradoxically useful for certain types of seizures. This simulation shows how inhibition of inhibitory cells (the RE cells) produces this counter-intuitive effect.
11.  Electrodecrements in in vitro model of infantile spasms (Traub et al 2020)
The code is an extension of the thalamocortical model of Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol. It is here applied to an in vitro model of the electrodecremental response seen in the EEG of children with infantile spasms (West syndrome)
12.  High frequency stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus (Rubin and Terman 2004)
" ... Using a computational model, this paper considers the hypothesis that DBS works by replacing pathologically rhythmic basal ganglia output with tonic, high frequency firing. In our simulations of parkinsonian conditions, rhythmic inhibition from GPi to the thalamus compromises the ability of thalamocortical relay (TC) cells to respond to depolarizing inputs, such as sensorimotor signals. High frequency stimulation of STN regularizes GPi firing, and this restores TC responsiveness, despite the increased frequency and amplitude of GPi inhibition to thalamus that result. We provide a mathematical phase plane analysis of the mechanisms that determine TC relay capabilities in normal, parkinsonian, and DBS states in a reduced model. This analysis highlights the differences in deinactivation of the low-threshold calcium T -current that we observe in TC cells in these different conditions. ..."
13.  Investigation of different targets in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson`s (Pirini et al. 2009)
"We investigated by a computational model of the basal ganglia the different network effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s disease (PD) in different target sites in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), and the globus pallidus pars externa (GPe). A cellular-based model of the basal ganglia system (BGS), based on the model proposed by Rubin and Terman (J Comput Neurosci 16:211–235, 2004), was developed. ... Our results suggest that DBS in the STN could functionally restore the TC relay activity, while DBS in the GPe and in the GPi could functionally over-activate and inhibit it, respectively. Our results are consistent with the experimental and the clinical evidences on the network effects of DBS."
14.  Knox implementation of Destexhe 1998 spike and wave oscillation model (Knox et al 2018)
" ...The aim of this study was to use an established thalamocortical computer model to determine how T-type calcium channels work in concert with cortical excitability to contribute to pathogenesis and treatment response in CAE. METHODS: The model is comprised of cortical pyramidal, cortical inhibitory, thalamocortical relay, and thalamic reticular single-compartment neurons, implemented with Hodgkin-Huxley model ion channels and connected by AMPA, GABAA , and GABAB synapses. Network behavior was simulated for different combinations of T-type calcium channel conductance, inactivation time, steady state activation/inactivation shift, and cortical GABAA conductance. RESULTS: Decreasing cortical GABAA conductance and increasing T-type calcium channel conductance converted spindle to spike and wave oscillations; smaller changes were required if both were changed in concert. In contrast, left shift of steady state voltage activation/inactivation did not lead to spike and wave oscillations, whereas right shift reduced network propensity for oscillations of any type...."
15.  LGNcircuit: Minimal LGN network model of temporal processing of visual input (Norheim et al. 2012)
The responses of relay cells in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) are shaped by their diverse set of impinging inputs: feedforward synaptic inputs stemming from retina, and feedback inputs stemming from the visual cortex and the thalamic reticular nucleus. This MATLAB model, with an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI), explores possible roles of these feedforward and feedback inputs in shaping the temporal part of the receptive fields of LGN relay cells with, so called, ON symmetry. A minimal mechanistic firing-rate model tailored to elucidate salient feedforward and feedback effects is considered including, in particular, feedforward excitation and inhibition (via interneurons) from retinal ON cells and excitatory and inhibitory (via thalamic reticular nucleus cells and interneurons) feedback from cortical ON and OFF cells. Various types of visual stimuli can be explored: flashing spots, impulses, sinusoidal gratings.
16.  Low Threshold Calcium Currents in TC cells (Destexhe et al 1998)
In Destexhe, Neubig, Ulrich, and Huguenard (1998) experiments and models examine low threshold calcium current's (IT, or T-current) distribution in thalamocortical (TC) cells. Multicompartmental modeling supports the hypothesis that IT currents have a density at least several fold higher in the dendrites than the soma. The IT current contributes significantly to rebound bursts and is thought to have important network behavior consequences. See the paper for details. See also http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr Correspondance may be addressed to Alain Destexhe: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
17.  Low Threshold Calcium Currents in TC cells (Destexhe et al 1998) (Brian)
R Brette's implementation in Brian 2 of Destexhe et al 1998's model. The author's original code is also available from ModelDB with accession number 279 (yes, was one of the first models in ModelDB)!
18.  Multiple dynamical modes of thalamic relay neurons (Wang XJ 1994)
The (Wang 1994) papers model was replicated in python by (Detorakis 2016). "The model is conductance-based and takes advantage of the interplay between a T-type calcium current and a non-specific cation sag current and thus, it is able to generate spindle and delta rhythms." The model also generates intermittent phase locking, non periodic firing, bursts, and tonic spike patterns.
19.  Neural mass model of spindle generation in the isolated thalamus (Schellenberger Costa et al. 2016)
The model generates different oscillatory patterns in the thalamus, including delta and spindle band oscillations.
20.  Neural mass model of the sleeping thalamocortical system (Schellenberger Costa et al 2016)
This paper generates typical human EEG data of sleep stages N2/N3 as well as wakefulness and REM sleep.
21.  Pyramidal Neuron: Deep, Thalamic Relay and Reticular, Interneuron (Destexhe et al 1998, 2001)
This package shows single-compartment models of different classes of cortical neurons, such as the "regular-spiking", "fast-spiking" and "bursting" (LTS) neurons. The mechanisms included are the Na+ and K+ currents for generating action potentials (INa, IKd), the T-type calcium current (ICaT), and a slow voltage-dependent K+ current (IM). See http://cns.fmed.ulaval.ca/alain_demos.html
22.  Rat LGN Thalamocortical Neuron (Connelly et al 2015, 2016)
" ... Here, combining data from fluorescence-targeted dendritic recordings and Ca2+ imaging from low-threshold spiking cells in rat brain slices with computational modeling, the cellular mechanism responsible for LTS (Low Threshold Spike) generation is established. ..." " ... Using dendritic recording, 2-photon glutamate uncaging, and computational modeling, we investigated how rat dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus thalamocortical neurons integrate excitatory corticothalamic feedback. ..."
23.  Relative spike time coding and STDP-based orientation selectivity in V1 (Masquelier 2012)
Phenomenological spiking model of the cat early visual system. We show how natural vision can drive spike time correlations on sufficiently fast time scales to lead to the acquisition of orientation-selective V1 neurons through STDP. This is possible without reference times such as stimulus onsets, or saccade landing times. But even when such reference times are available, we demonstrate that the relative spike times encode the images more robustly than the absolute ones.
24.  Signal integration in LGN cells (Briska et al 2003)
Computer models were used to investigate passive properties of lateral geniculate nucleus thalamocortical cells and thalamic interneurons based on in vitro whole-cell study. Two neurons of each type were characterized physiologically and morphologically. Differences in the attenuation of propagated signals depend on both cell morphology and signal frequency. See the paper for details.
25.  Sleep-wake transitions in corticothalamic system (Bazhenov et al 2002)
The authors investigate the transition between sleep and awake states with intracellular recordings in cats and computational models. The model describes many essential features of slow wave sleep and activated states as well as the transition between them.
26.  Spikes,synchrony,and attentive learning by laminar thalamocort. circuits (Grossberg & Versace 2007)
"... The model hereby clarifies, for the first time, how the following levels of brain organization coexist to realize cognitive processing properties that regulate fast learning and stable memory of brain representations: single cell properties, such as spiking dynamics, spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), and acetylcholine modulation; detailed laminar thalamic and cortical circuit designs and their interactions; aggregate cell recordings, such as current-source densities and local field potentials; and single cell and large-scale inter-areal oscillations in the gamma and beta frequency domains. ..."
27.  Study of augmented Rubin and Terman 2004 deep brain stim. model in Parkinsons (Pascual et al. 2006)
" ... The model by Rubin and Terman [31] represents one of the most comprehensive and biologically plausible models of DBS published recently. We examined the validity of the model, replicated its simulations and tested its robustness. While our simulations partially reproduced the results presented by Rubin and Terman [31], several issues were raised including the high complexity of the model in its non simplified form, the lack of robustness of the model with respect to small perturbations, the nonrealistic representation of the thalamus and the absence of time delays. Computational models are indeed necessary, but they may not be sufficient in their current forms to explain the effect of chronic electrical stimulation on the activity of the basal ganglia (BG) network in PD."
28.  T-type Ca current in thalamic neurons (Wang et al 1991)
A model of the transient, low-threshold voltage-dependent (T-type) Ca2+ current is constructed using whole-cell voltage-clamp data from enzymatically isolated rat thalamocortical relay neurons. The T-type Ca2+ current is described according to the Hodgkin-Huxley scheme, using the m3h format, with rate constants determined from the experimental data.
29.  Thalamic network model of deep brain stimulation in essential tremor (Birdno et al. 2012)
"... Thus the decreased effectiveness of temporally irregular DBS trains is due to long pauses in the stimulus trains, not the degree of temporal irregularity alone. We also conducted computer simulations of neuronal responses to the experimental stimulus trains using a biophysical model of the thalamic network. Trains that suppressed tremor in volunteers also suppressed fluctuations in thalamic transmembrane potential at the frequency associated with cerebellar burst-driver inputs. Clinical and computational findings indicate that DBS suppresses tremor by masking burst-driver inputs to the thalamus and that pauses in stimulation prevent such masking. Although stimulation of other anatomic targets may provide tremor suppression, we propose that the most relevant neuronal targets for effective tremor suppression are the afferent cerebellar fibers that terminate in the thalamus."
30.  Thalamic neuron, zebra finch DLM: Integration of pallidal and cortical inputs (Goldberg et al. 2012)
This is a single-compartment model of a zebra finch thalamic relay neuron from nucleus DLM. It is used to explore the interaction between cortex-like glutamatergic input and pallidum-like GABAergic input as they control the spiking output of these neurons.
31.  Thalamic neuron: Modeling rhythmic neuronal activity (Meuth et al. 2005)
The authors use an in vitro cell model of a single acutely isolated thalamic neuron in the NEURON simulation environment to address and discuss questions in an undergraduate course. Topics covered include passive electrical properties, composition of action potentials, trains of action potentials, multicompartment modeling, and research topics. The paper includes detailed instructions on how to run the simulations in the appendix.
32.  Thalamic quiescence of spike and wave seizures (Lytton et al 1997)
A phase plane analysis of a two cell interaction between a thalamocortical neuron (TC) and a thalamic reticularis neuron (RE).
33.  Thalamic Relay Neuron: I-h (McCormick, Pape 1990)
NEURON mod files for the Ih current from the paper: McCormick DA, Pape HC. Properties of a hyperpolarization-activated cation current and its role in rhythmic oscillation in thalamic relay neurones. J. Physiol. 1990 431:291-318.
34.  Thalamic Relay Neuron: I-T current (Williams, Stuart 2000)
NEURON mod files for the Ca-T current from the paper: Williams SR, Stuart GJ, Action potential backpropagation and somato-dendritic distribution of ion channels in thalamocortical neurons. J Neurosci. 2000 20:1307-17. Contact michele.migliore@pa.ibf.cnr.it if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
35.  Thalamic transformation of pallidal input (Hadipour-Niktarash 2006)
"In Parkinson’s disease, neurons of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) display the low-frequency tremor-related oscillations. These oscillatory activities are transmitted to the thalamic relay nuclei. Computer models of the interacting thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular (RE) neurons were used to explore how the TC-RE network processes the low-frequency oscillations of the GPi neurons. ..."
36.  Thalamocortical and Thalamic Reticular Network (Destexhe et al 1996)
NEURON model of oscillations in networks of thalamocortical and thalamic reticular neurons in the ferret. (more applications for a model quantitatively identical to previous DLGN model; updated for NEURON v4 and above)
37.  Thalamocortical augmenting response (Bazhenov et al 1998)
In the cortical model, augmenting responses were more powerful in the "input" layer compared with those in the "output" layer. Cortical stimulation of the network model produced augmenting responses in cortical neurons in distant cortical areas through corticothalamocortical loops and low-threshold intrathalamic augmentation. ... The predictions of the model were compared with in vivo recordings from neurons in cortical area 4 and thalamic ventrolateral nucleus of anesthetized cats. The known intrinsic properties of thalamic cells and thalamocortical interconnections can account for the basic properties of cortical augmenting responses. See reference for details. NEURON implementation note: cortical SU cells are getting slightly too little stimulation - reason unknown.
38.  Thalamocortical Relay cell under current clamp in high-conductance state (Zeldenrust et al 2018)
Mammalian thalamocortical relay (TCR) neurons switch their firing activity between a tonic spiking and a bursting regime. In a combined experimental and computational study, we investigated the features in the input signal that single spikes and bursts in the output spike train represent and how this code is influenced by the membrane voltage state of the neuron. Identical frozen Gaussian noise current traces were injected into TCR neurons in rat brain slices to adjust, fine-tune and validate a three-compartment TCR model cell (Destexhe et al. 1998, accession number 279). Three currents were added: an h-current (Destexhe et al. 1993,1996, accession number 3343), a high-threshold calcium current and a calcium- activated potassium current (Huguenard & McCormick 1994, accession number 3808). The information content carried by the various types of events in the signal as well as by the whole signal was calculated. Bursts phase-lock to and transfer information at lower frequencies than single spikes. On depolarization the neuron transits smoothly from the predominantly bursting regime to a spiking regime, in which it is more sensitive to high-frequency fluctuations. Finally, the model was used to in the more realistic “high-conductance state” (Destexhe et al. 2001, accession number 8115), while being stimulated with a Poisson input (Brette et al. 2007, Vogels & Abbott 2005, accession number 83319), where fluctuations are caused by (synaptic) conductance changes instead of current injection. Under “standard” conditions bursts are difficult to initiate, given the high degree of inactivation of the T-type calcium current. Strong and/or precisely timed inhibitory currents were able to remove this inactivation.
39.  The origin of different spike and wave-like events (Hall et al 2017)
Acute In vitro models have revealed a great deal of information about mechanisms underlying many types of epileptiform activity. However, few examples exist that shed light on spike and wave (SpW) patterns of pathological activity. SpW are seen in many epilepsy syndromes, both generalised and focal, and manifest across the entire age spectrum. They are heterogeneous in terms of their severity, symptom burden and apparent anatomical origin (thalamic, neocortical or both), but any relationship between this heterogeneity and underlying pathology remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that physiological delta frequency rhythms act as an effective substrate to permit modelling of SpW of cortical origin and may help to address this issue. ..."
40.  Unbalanced peptidergic inhibition in superficial cortex underlies seizure activity (Hall et al 2015)
" ...Loss of tonic neuromodulatory excitation, mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine or serotonin (5HT3A) receptors, of 5HT3-immunopositive interneurons caused an increase in amplitude and slowing of the delta rhythm until each period became the "wave" component of the spike and wave discharge. As with the normal delta rhythm, the wave of a spike and wave discharge originated in cortical layer 5. In contrast, the "spike" component of the spike and wave discharge originated from a relative failure of fast inhibition in layers 2/3-switching pyramidal cell action potential outputs from single, sparse spiking during delta rhythms to brief, intense burst spiking, phase-locked to the field spike. The mechanisms underlying this loss of superficial layer fast inhibition, and a concomitant increase in slow inhibition, appeared to be precipitated by a loss of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-mediated local circuit inhibition and a subsequent increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated disinhibition. Blockade of NPY Y1 receptors was sufficient to generate spike and wave discharges, whereas blockade of VIP receptors almost completely abolished this form of epileptiform activity. These data suggest that aberrant, activity-dependent neuropeptide corelease can have catastrophic effects on neocortical dynamics."

Re-display model names without descriptions